Tags » Ben Jonson

Ben Jonson - "Volpone" Act I Scene 1

Volpone enters with his hanger-on Mosca (the fly) and performs a rite of opening the alcove where his gold is stored, after which he addresses it with a sort of prayer, eulogizing its power in a  distinctly sacrilegious way, as the whole act is a parody of the morning prayer. 244 more words

Seventeenth-century Literature

Being Cavalier

Though often I do play a sonneteer,
Please think of me as not less cavalier;
And read in lines nor writ with ink nor pen… 8 more words

Poems

Ben Jonson - "Volpone"

Volpone begins, following the Roman playwright Plautus, with “The Argument”, a short acrostic verse which summarizes the plot of the story and whose first letters of each line form the name of the title character. 227 more words

Seventeenth-century Literature

Ben Jonson - "The Masque of Blackness" (the end)

The nymphs dance, after which the daughters of Oceanus are called back to the sea. Aethiopia/Moon bids them farewell and tells the daughters of Niger that they are going to stay here in the kingdom of Albion. 99 more words

Literature

Ben Jonson - "The Masque of Blackness" (ctd.)

The face in the lake tells the daughters of Niger to go to a country whose name ends with “-tania” and where the sun does not shine so much so it won’t burn their skins anymore. 269 more words

Seventeenth-century Literature

Ben Jonson - "The Masque of Blackness" (ctd.)

Oceanus asks his son Niger what makes him flow all the way through east to west. Niger answers with a completely irrelevant speech (whose only point is to show off the author’s learning) about how it is not strange that he can mix his fresh water with Oceanus’ salty one, because the soul can both mix with and stay separate from the body. 212 more words

Seventeenth-century Literature

Ben Jonson - "The Masque of Blackness"

The masque was a complicated and vastly expensive multimedia extravaganza, combining music, dance and spoken word, aimed at obsequious flattery of the king. The currently fashionable approach reads them as “subtly interrogating” and “subverting” the ideology of the Stuart monarchy, but honestly, it takes some proper  lit-crit credentials to see all that subversion. 97 more words

Literature