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Film Review: 'California Dreams'

Destitute and clinging to threadbare hope, an aspiring Hollywood high-flyer rehearses her Oscar speech at one point in Mike Ott’s is-it-or-isn’t-it docufiction “California Dreams” — though as her earnest sentiments gush forth, it’s entirely someone else’s acceptance speech that springs poignantly to mind. 792 more words

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Film Review: 'Discreet'

There can be a paradoxically public intimacy to YouTube culture: an artificial sense of personal connection forged by those everyday video updates, so many of which feign a diaristic, confessional tone that can both alleviate and prey on loneliness among those watching. 561 more words

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Berlinale FILM CAPSULE: Colo (Villaverde, 2017): Portugal

Posted by Larry Gleeson

Colo, a new film by Alce Films from Writer/Director Teresa Villaverde was screened at the 67th Berlin International Film Festival in Competition. 321 more words

Film

Berlin Film Review: 'The Erlprince'

A dazzling cinematic style becomes the dreamy, death-obsessed substance of a troubled teen’s mind in Polish helmer-writer Kuba Czekaj’s wild coming-of-age tale “The Erlprince.” While riffing on Goethe’s famous poem “The Erlking” to reflect the world in a mirror of fables, the drama reflects on, among other things, an approaching apocalypse and the possible existence of parallel worlds. 490 more words

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Berlin Film Review: 'Monsieur Mayonnaise'

Indefatigable Australian filmmaker-artist Philippe Mora criss-crosses the globe tracing his family’s survival during the Holocaust in Trevor Graham’s ingredient-heavy documentary “Monsieur Mayonnaise.” Revisiting some of the material Mora himself used in last year’s “Three Days in Auschwitz,” the film is a frequently fascinating if over-egged affair in which the French-born subject storyboards a personal graphic novel while recounting the remarkable story of his German-Jewish father’s work for the French Resistance and his French-Jewish mother’s miraculous escape from the gas chambers. 480 more words

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Berlin Film Review: 'Summer 1993'

A 6-year-old orphan goes to live with her uncle’s family in Carla Simón’s sensitive, understated autobiographical debut, “Summer 1993.” Striking a careful balance between narrative and atmosphere, the writer-director paints a vivid portrait of a light-filled summer when a little girl has to face the loss of her mother and integration into a new nuclear family. 616 more words

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Berlin Film Review: 'Up in the Sky'

There are kids movies that nod to the fact that there will be adults in the audience by including winky references that fly over younger heads, or peppering the dialogue with pop culture allusions, or operating on some ironic double level. 690 more words

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