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Five Questions You Always Wanted to Ask About Your Breast Health

By Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Correspondent

Jennifer Ford, ANP-BC, WHNP-BC, MS, RN, a nurse practitioner in the BreastCare Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, addresses some of the most common questions on breast health. 507 more words

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

An Open Letter to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, you have been a part of my life for the last 2.5 years. Here, I have found the most talented, dedicated, kind, and wonderful surgeons, nurse practitioners, surgical residents, and nurses. 1,576 more words

'Concealed' Scar Technique for Breast Surgery Promotes Emotional Healing

By, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Correspondent

Approximately one in eight women will develop breast cancer during the course of her lifetime. Although genetic testing can identify individuals who have inherited a harmful gene (BRCA1 or BRCA2) that increases breast cancer risk, other factors, such as a woman’s reproductive history or a family history of some cancers, can also increase the risk of developing the disease. 444 more words

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

New Treatments for Lymphedema Available at BIDMC

By Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Correspondent

Plastic surgeons at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) are bringing new hope to cancer patients by offering innovative procedures for both preventing and treating lymphedema. 979 more words

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Meet Kate: A Cancer Survivor Who Calls BIDMC Docs 'Heroes'

By Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Correspondent

Kate Grimes, a physical therapist from Belmont, MA, was 33 when her doctors first used the word “cancer.” 625 more words

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Healthy Diet Key to Decreasing Breast Cancer Risk

By Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Correspondent

The key to decreasing a woman’s risk of breast cancer may lie in her diet.

Eating foods packed with powerful nutrients has been shown to lower a female’s risk of developing the disease by up to 38 percent. 392 more words

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center