Tags » Booker Prize

Why You Should Read The Inheritance of Loss (K.Desai)

Synopsis: Up in the Himalayas,in a derelict house,live three contrasting figures.The judge,left bitter and haunted by his past.His orphan granddaughter,enamoured of her tutor,despite the difference in their ideals.And the cook,whose heart belongs to his son,a struggling illegal immigrant in America.Down in Kalimpong,civil unrest is gaining momentum and threatens to pit the past against the present,nationalism against love,a small world against the troubles of a big world. 805 more words

Literature

‘In a Strange Room’ by Damon Galgut

Since starting on my personal determination to read all winning and shortlisted books of both the Man Booker and Miles Franklin awards, new names (to me) are constantly popping up. 491 more words

Literature

'The Book of Evidence' by John Banville

Unreliable narrator Freddie Montgomery, sitting in prison awaiting trial for murder, recounts his story of just how he finds himself liable to face life imprisonment in an Irish jail. 279 more words

Booker Prize

‘What reality was ever made by realists?’

Richard Flanagan’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North is a difficult book. Not difficult in the way that I find Joyce difficult, but rather difficult in that it defies any coherent understanding. 702 more words

Political Theory

'Paddy Ha Ha Ha' by Roddy Doyle

The first reaction to knowing Roddy Doyle’s Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha was the recipient of the Booker Prize is that 1993 must have been a minor year in the literary world. 262 more words

Booker Prize

Contemporary British Fiction: Response to "Hotel du Lac" by Anita Brookner

I was very much struck by the amount of times the word “silence” is used in relation to the female characters, namely Mme de Bonneuil and Edith. 335 more words

'The Sisters Brothers' by Patrick deWitt

Darkly comic, set in the Californian Gold Rush-era, The Sisters Brothers is a grippingly original tale of death, mayhem and redemption.

Yet, with the announcement of the inclusion of Patrick deWitt’s sophomore novel in the shortlist for the 2011 Man Booker Prize, many a critic’s eyebrow was raised.  432 more words

Booker Prize