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Final Jeopardy 5-22-2017

May 22, 2017

 

Final Jeopardy Category:

 

British Empire

 

Final Jeopardy Clue:

 

The city that some 19th century Englishmen called “Caranjee” is now the biggest city in this country… 7 more words

Nathaniel Mauger

New Book: “The West Indian Generation”

The West Indian Generation: Remaking British Culture in London, 1945–1965 by Amanda Bidnall was published by Liverpool University Press in April 2017. 

Description:  Between Britain’s imperial victory in the Second World War and its introduction of race-based immigration restriction ‘at home,’ London’s relationship with its burgeoning West Indian settler community was a cauldron of apprehension, optimism, ignorance, and curiosity. 236 more words

News

Mr. Militant Negro reblogged this on The Militant Negro™ and commented:

NEW BOOK: “THE WEST INDIAN GENERATION”

original_95cdd93f-9fed-4952-9bfd-7a45a147908e The West Indian Generation: Remaking British Culture in London, 1945–1965 by Amanda Bidnall was published by Liverpool University Press in April 2017. [Many thanks to Peter Jordens for bringing this item to our attention.] Description:  Between Britain’s imperial victory in the Second World War and its introduction of race-based immigration restriction ‘at home,’ London’s relationship with its burgeoning West Indian settler community was a cauldron of apprehension, optimism, ignorance, and curiosity. The West Indian Generation: Remaking British Culture in London, 1945–1965 revisits this not-quite-postcolonial moment through the careers of a unique generation of West Indian artists that included actors Earl Cameron, Edric Connor, Pearl Connor, Cy Grant, Ronald Moody, Barry and Lloyd Reckord, and calypso greats Lord Beginner and Lord Kitchener. Colonial subjects turned British citizens, they tested the parameters of cultural belonging through their work. Drawing upon familiar and neglected artifacts from London’s cultural archives, Amanda Bidnall sketches the feathery roots of this community as it was both nurtured and inhibited by metropolitan institutions and producers hoping variously to promote imperial solidarity, educate mainstream audiences, and sensationalize racial conflict. Upon a shared foundation of language, education, and middle-class values, a fascinating collaboration took place between popular West Indian artists and cultural authorities like the Royal Court Theatre, the Rank Organisation, and the BBC. By analyzing the potential—and limits—of this collaboration, Bidnall demonstrates the mainstream influence and perceptive politics of pioneering West Indian artists. Their ambivalent and complicated reception by the British government, media, and populace draws a tangled picture of postwar national belonging. The West Indian Generation is necessary reading for anyone interested in the cultural ramifications of the end of empire, New Commonwealth migration, and the production of Black Britain. Or more information, see https://liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/collections/series-migrations-and-identities/products/78240

Spengler and Destiny

I’ve been reading Oswald Spengler again, and what he writes about destiny. If you’re going to discover your destiny – the destiny of your culture, of your family, or your own personal destiny – you need to get out of the habit of thinking about cause and effect. 343 more words

Books

Trump regurgitates British myths in his Saudi Conference speech.

Anyone with half a brain cell knows that Saudi Arabia shares the same ideology as ISIS and al-Qaeda. Anyone knows that only last year candidate Donald Trump rightly condemned Hilary Clinton’s proximity to the Saudi Arabian ruling clan while at the same time supposedly being a champion of women’s rights. 529 more words

British Imperialism

Book Review: The Secret History of The Jungle Book

The Secret History of The Jungle Book, by Swati Singh, is a fresh if brief consideration of Rudyard Kipling and, arguably, his most famous creation. It is divided into three parts which look at: The Jungle Book’s popularity, reach and longevity; the man who wrote it; what his character, Mowgli, can teach us today. 521 more words

Book Review

81 years ago today - T.E. Lawrence

6 days after coming off his Brough Superior motorcycle in a crash while avoiding two boys bicycling on a road T.E. Lawrence, aka Emir Dynamite for his skill in railroad and bridge demolition dies, never having regained consciousness. 16 more words

Military History

In Quest(ion) of Indentity

The ambiguous identity of Antigua—an independent country or a(n) (ex)colony of West Imperialism—is presented in Kincaid’s A Small Place to criticize West Imperialism. Here, the book uses every element of narrative strategy to question as well as attack West Imperialism through tourism.  1,323 more words

Shining Stars