Tags » CEP 812

The final wicked problem

How do you solve a wicked problem? You survey, research, and propose solutions. A wicked problem like “How to create meaningful interaction between students and technology” is going to change solutions depending on the context in which the problem is considered. 802 more words

CEP 812

All of the data

After creating a survey that focused on the question of how do students create meaningful interaction between all students and technology it was time to evaluate the data. 659 more words

CEP 812

Defining the problem

The problem with wicked problems is that they are just that wicked. There is no set solution. The solution to the problem will change depending on the classroom, teacher, and abilities of those involved. 368 more words

CEP 812

Why, How, and What if

Creating a sketch note video is not as easy as it looks. Having already established my questions I started by sorting them into the categories of why, how, and what if. 300 more words

CEP 812

Questioning for life

Teaching middle school math is hard. Look who’s talking – I hated math in elementary school (it took forever to complete homework assignments), and I defiantly recycled the extra credit assignments (after completing them – I didn’t feel the need to turn them in) that my middle school math teacher gave me when I finished my work before everyone else. 646 more words

CEP 812

Wicked Problem Project Solution

Throughout CEP 812, I have been working on a group project to solve the wicked problem: Allowing failure to be as powerful a learning mode as success. 506 more words

CEP 812

Learning from Failure Survey

In CEP 812 this week, my group worked on finding a “best bad solution” to the wicked problem: allowing failure to be as powerful a learning mode as success. 336 more words

CEP 812