Tags » Charles Sumner

"Do any sigh for a Thermopylae?"

We left Charles Sumner again putting Washington City behind him; he took his oath for a second term in the Senate and then his leave. 487 more words

Road To War

"I have sat in my seat only on one day." Back to Washington

Preston Brooks accomplished many things by breaking his cane over Charles Sumner’s head. He vindicated South Carolina and his elderly relative. He vented his personal rage. 486 more words

Road To War

Re-Electing Charles Sumner

Senator Sumner returned to Boston in something resembling triumph. Though badly traumatized and still suffering from his assault by Preston Brooks, he came home a hero and a martyr. 463 more words

Road To War

A Boston Welcome for Charles Sumner

Charles Sumner gave up convalescence at Cresson, Pennsylvania, and returned to Philadelphia. There he received bad news yet again: his doctor believed that Sumner must refrain from any physical or mental excitement if he wanted to live. 471 more words

Road To War

"I may yet be doomed to that heaviest of all afflictions, to spend my time on earth in a living sepulcher."

We left Charles Sumner at a health spa up in the Alleghenies. There he continued to struggle with his recovery, but seemed at last on a slow mend. 367 more words

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"His steps were feeble and tottering"

Charles Sumner declined to take any further part in Preston Brooks’ prosecution than grand jury testimony; he did not consider himself at all well. The psychological strain of revisiting the attack constantly, perhaps even in Brooks’ presence, can’t have appealed even when he felt physically better and Sumner rarely felt that. 463 more words

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"It is impossible to regard him without apprehension."

Charles Sumner ended May of 1856 in a poor state. His head wound became infected, but after his doctors let the pus drain Sumner improved. Then he took a further plunge, likely courtesy of various complications from the wound and the infection. 539 more words

Road To War