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Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #111

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

xxx (see below) to play and win.

Bogoljubov v Monticlli, San Remo 1930

Solution

The book doesn’t say which side is to win: normally it is obvious, and when it isn’t obvious, a quick look at the players’ names makes it all clear: Alekhine v unknown, simul, is likely to be 1-0. 74 more words

Chess

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #110

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

White to play and mate Black (and, today, there is a second puzzle below)

Grünfeld v Wagner, London 1927 (using the date from Megabase: the book says 1929) 107 more words

Chess

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #109

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

White to play and mate Black.

Ekström v unknown, Svedska 1929

Solution

A nice variation of a standard sacrificial idea: 1 Qg7+! 30 more words

Chess

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #108

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

xxx (see below) to play and win (i.e. decide which side is to play first)

Vidmar v Euwe, Karlovy Vary {per the book, Karlsbad per Megabase) 1929… 196 more words

Chess

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #107

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

Black to play and win.

Havasi v Monticelli, Budapest, 1929

Solution

Once I saw it was Black to play- the book doesn’t indicate which side it is to move (!) I immediately realised it was a back rank mate theme, exploiting the looseness of White’s Queen. 272 more words

Chess

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #106

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

White to play and mate Black

Spielmann v Honlinger, Bec 1929

Solution

A ‘standard’ motif, but nice nevertheless to work out the correct order of moves to achieve the aim. 67 more words

Chess

Daily chess puzzle: Check Mate #105

Another puzzle from Dragoslav Andric’s 1981 book “Matni Udar”.

White to play and mate Black

Steinbrecher v Banzinger, Monaco 1929

Solution

Straightforward today, since examining all biffs means you have to look at the only capture: 1 Qh6+! 36 more words

Chess