Tags » Church Polity

Have Some Traditions Become Idols?

Then some Pharisees and teachers of the law came to Jesus from Jerusalem and asked, “Why do your disciples break the tradition of the elders? They don’t wash their hands before they eat!”

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Worship

Definitions and Other Challenges

By Tom Chantry

I have been writing this week on questions of local church polity as they have been addressed by Reformed Baptists, and on the comparative model of Presbyterianism. 170 more words

Reformed Baptists

Understanding the Presbyterian Model

By Tom Chantry

Yesterday I wrote about some of the problems faced by Reformed Baptists in developing our polity. Differences between us have been exacerbated by the fact that some – but not all – of us have been influenced by Presbyterianism, particularly with regard to local polity. 105 more words

Reformed Baptists

A Few Polity Questions

By Tom Chantry

One of the issues which continues to bedevil the Reformed Baptist movement as we seek to adopt and apply not only the doctrine but also the polity of our confession of faith is the relationship of the title “pastor” to that of “elder.” For any of us to pretend that this matter has been resolved is probably to deceive ourselves. 83 more words

Reformed Baptists

Seven Theses on Church Polity

On Monday I suggested that three interrelated questions of church polity have been woven through the fabric of the modern Reformed Baptist movement: the plurality of the eldership, the nature of parity within the eldership, and the confessional requirement for an associational check on the exercise of church authority. 3,445 more words

Definitions and Other Challenges

I have been writing this week on questions of local church polity as they have been addressed by Reformed Baptists, and on the comparative model of… 2,490 more words

Understanding the Presbyterian Model

Yesterday I wrote about some of the problems faced by Reformed Baptists in developing our polity. Differences between us have been exacerbated by the fact that some – but not all – of us have been influenced by Presbyterianism, particularly with regard to local polity. 1,645 more words