Tags » Civil-military Relations

Mad Dog

It happened. It really happened. And meme-creators everywhere rejoice!

As reported in the Washington Post and elsewhere, “Mad Dog” Jim Mattis, the Warrior Monk, callsign Chaos, and hands-down the most revered American warrior still resident among the living, is being tapped by the new administration (pending Senate confirmation) as Secretary of Defense. 204 more words

Bureaucracy

Heavy Is The Crown: The Price One Pays For Raising One's Hand To Serve His Or Her Country

Over a series of posts, I have explored the jurisdiction of the military to prosecute American citizens for non-military offenses within the United States, while civilian courts are open for business and in the absence of a declaration of war. 3,205 more words

Military Legal History

Public Critics vs Informed Monitors: The Parliament and Overseeing the Canadian Armed Forces

by Steve Saideman

I am mighty pleased that the first piece of the Phil/Dave/Steve project on legislatures and oversight over the armed forces of the world’s democracies is now published: “ 582 more words

Faculty Posts

Parliament should scrutinize, not have a say, on military deployments

by Philippe Lagassé

What role should Parliament play in military deployments? The question has come up again owing to the Trudeau government’s pledge to deploy the Canadian Armed Forces on a UN peace operation. 1,077 more words

Faculty Posts

RUSI Journal - Turkey: What Hides Behind a Failed Coup Attempt

The full article is available on the Royal United Services Institute’s website or via Taylor&Francis Online (free access) at http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03071847.2016.1228291

Turkey

Musing on Drill Weekend

It’s drill weekend and I’m camped out in Norfolk for some quality time with other Reservists. These weekends are always a fine opportunity to break away from the “real world”, if only for 48 hours or so. 584 more words

Strategy

How do Military Coups Fail?

DR GERAINT HUGHES

On the night of Friday 15th July 2016 elements of the Turkish armed forces attempted to overthrow the democratically-elected – but increasingly authoritarian – government of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. 1,712 more words