Tags » Claudia Moscovici

Could the Holocaust happen again? Simon Wiesenthal's answer

Alan Levy’s study of the life and works of Nazi hunter and world-renowned author Simon Wiesenthal, Nazi Hunter: The Wiesenthal File (New York, Barnes and Noble Books, 1993), probes the question that is at the bottom of any profound understanding of the Holocaust: Could the Holocaust happen again? 641 more words

Claudia Moscovici

Why were so few Jews saved during the Holocaust?

In her comprehensive historical study, The Holocaust, Leni Yahil asks a question which, decades later, we still haven’t satisfactorily answered: “Why were so few of the millions of Jews who had been living in Europe prior to the Holocaust saved?” ( 638 more words

Claudia Moscovici

Why were so few Jews saved during the Holocaust?

In her comprehensive historical study, The Holocaust, Leni Yahil asks a question which, decades later, we still haven’t satisfactorily answered: “Why were so few of the millions of Jews who had been living in Europe prior to the Holocaust saved?” ( 638 more words

Claudia Moscovici

Anti-Semitism in Hungary today

Anti-Semitism has a long history in Hungary, nearly as long as the history of the Jews living in the country. In fact, Hitler was not the first to prescribe armband to mark, isolate and shame the Jews. 622 more words

Claudia Moscovici

The Holocaust in Hungary

Historian Leni Yahil estimates that in 1941 there were approximately 762,000 Jews living in Hungary, about a fourth of whom lived in Budapest. (The Holocaust… 703 more words

Claudia Moscovici

The Wannsee Conference: Casually planning the Final Solution

On January 20, 1942 fifteen high-ranking Nazi officials got together at the at the elegant villa located at 56-58 Am Grossen Wannsee near Berlin to plan the mass murder of European Jews, code-named “the Final Solution”. 687 more words

Claudia Moscovici

Eichmann's Extraordinary Evil: Review of Eichmann Before Jerusalem by Bettina Stangneth

In Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer (New York: Random House 2014), Bettina Stangneth challenges Hannah Arendt’s hypothesis that Eichmann represents the banality of evil: an ordinary man turned mass murder by extraordinary circumstances (the war and the rise of Nazi totalitarianism). 882 more words

Claudia Moscovici