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A Short Analysis of Sir Philip Sidney's Astrophil and Stella 31: 'With how sad steps, O moon'

A reading of a classic Sidney poem

Sonnet 31 from Sir Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella (sometimes Astrophel and Stella), which begins with the line ‘With how sad steps, O moon, thou climb’st the skies’, is one of the most famous poems in the entire sonnet sequence. 791 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Andrew Marvell's 'Bermudas'

A reading of a classic Marvell poem

Fancy a voice to a tropical paradise? Andrew Marvell (1621-78) provides just the poem in ‘Bermudas’. Marvell is one of the most critically acclaimed and studied poets of the seventeenth century, and his work is often associated with the Metaphysical Poets. 1,142 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of T. S. Eliot's 'Hysteria'

A critical reading of a short prose-poem

T. S. Eliot (1888-1965) published his first collection of poems, Prufrock and Other Observations, in 1917. This slim volume included poems written in a wide variety of styles and modes, from… 778 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Simon Armitage's 'A Vision'

A critical reading of a contemporary poem

Simon Armitage, who was born in Yorkshire in 1963, is one of the most popular and widely studied living English poets. 804 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Stevie Smith's 'Not Waving But Drowning'

A critical reading of a classic poem

‘Not Waving but Drowning’ is the best-known poem by Stevie Smith (1902-71). In 1995, it was voted Britain’s fourth favourite poem in a poll. 588 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Philip Larkin's 'Toads'

A critical reading of an iconic Larkin poem

‘Toads’ is one of Philip Larkin’s most famous poems. When asked later in an interview how he came up with the idea for the toad as a metaphor for work, Larkin replied, ‘Sheer genius.’ He probably had his tongue in his cheek when he said this, but it is an inspired and instantly memorable analogy. 747 more words

Literature

Surprises in Herman Hesse's Demian: A Study in Genre

In Herman Hesse’s novel Demian one recurring image that jumped out to me as a reader as being questionable was the image of the painting that is first referenced on page 65. 1,977 more words

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