Tags » Cockroaches

Migrants, cockroaches, deportees ... people

The almost unimaginable horror of people dying in the seas of Europe – and politicians declaring happily how many they had prevented from landing – has overwhelmed even the electioneering shouting of the past week. 431 more words

Martyn Joseph

Blessed (NOT) are the Listicles

Alternate post title:

10 REASONS YOU DON’T REALLY NEED A TOP 10 LIST OF ANYTHING TO MAKE A DECENT BLOG POST

1. Granted, lists are alluring. 186 more words

The Many Dangers of Cockroaches

Cockroaches have long been considered to be one of the most detested insects on earth, most likely due to their creepy and eery appearance. And while their appearance alone is basis enough for wanting to keep them out of your home, the fact that they have also been known to spread more than thirty types of bacteria, and can even cause allergic or asthmatic reactions in some, only adds to the fact that these are definitely visitors that are unwelcome. 366 more words

Cape Coral Pest Control Services

Cockroaches - The Guardian

An article I wrote for the Guardian about my series Cockroaches and the end of the world.  You can find the original here.

Cockroaches is a romantic comedy set 10 years after the end of the world. 767 more words

Articles

A Modest Proposal

Katie Hopkins, in her “Sun” article says that the people in boats trying to cross the Mediterranean from northern Africa are “Cockroaches” and wants to send a gunboat to deter them. 162 more words

N is for Nettable

Adjective land in alphabet land is getting to be a bit of a stretttttttch.

Nettable means capable of being netted.

Something I highly advise when travelling in insect filled countries (and yes, Canada is included) with creepy crawlers, flying cockroaches, and lurking biting things, just waiting for their chance. 442 more words

A To Z Challenge

Map: Detroit Regions of Cockroaches and Flies 1970-73

This map was part of William Bunge’s book co-authored with R. Bordessa, “The Canadian Alternative: Survival, Expeditions, and Urban Change.” These maps contribute to the authors’ display of the City of Death among their three distinctions which also include the City of Superfluity and the City of Need.

Detroit