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Writing the “Why [INSERT COLLEGE NAME]?” essay

Many colleges ask applicants to share why they are interested in attending their particular school. This is a sensible question given colleges want to gauge the extent to which the applicant is passionate about the school and would seriously consider attending if admitted. 609 more words

College Admissions

What does it mean to go to a “top” college?

Ask a typical high school student the question, “Where do you want to go to college?” They may mention a college or two by name, or simply say, “a top college.” But what does “top” even mean? 561 more words

College Admissions

The all-important recommendation letter

In addition to personal essays, a key part of the college application through which colleges really get to know applicants is the recommendation letter. Most colleges require a letter from a guidance counselor or college counselor and several more from teachers, coaches, mentors, or other members of your community. 525 more words

College Admissions

Braindumping the PSAT: A Few Questions for David Coleman

The day after the first PSAT sitting, two parents (at least, I think they were parents), posted this this exchange
on College Confidential (click to enlarge): 1,826 more words

College Admissions

Addressing a personal issue in the college application process

A nice feature of the holistic college admissions process is that, as applicants, you are given the opportunity to write about yourself – your ideas, your background, how you see the world. 501 more words

College Admissions

Applying for Admission with an “Invisible” Disability - Part 2: What to Disclose

I have already written about what factors a bright, high-achieving student (strong grades and scores) with an invisible disability should consider when choosing where to apply, especially whether the college or university will be able to accommodate your needs if you enroll.  917 more words

College Admissions

Applying for Admission with an “Invisible” Disability - Part 1: Where to Apply

A bright, high-achieving student (strong grades and test scores) who has an “invisible” disability has many more factors to consider in choosing where to apply and what to disclose in an application than a “typical” student.  1,124 more words

College Admissions