Tags » Comedy Of Errors

Graph of The Day

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/graph/?g=12Qv

This graph effectively proves much of the per capita income growth between 1962 and 1990 in the United States was nothing more than a result of the changing age structure and female entry into the workforce (resulting, presumably, from increasing automation of household tasks). 108 more words

Comedy Of Errors

Nana's Comedy of Errors

On Mondays, I take a 1-1/2 hour drive to baby sit Batman and Robin while Mommy is still at work, and Daddy is off teaching a night class.  584 more words

O'Reilly Was Shamed By Al Franken For Untruth In 2003


Majority Report

Majority Report looks at the time Al Franken took on Bill O’Reilly by publicly calling him out for telling a lie about the journalism award he received for the show Inside Edition. 29 more words

U.s. Politics

nanarhonda reblogged this on My Soapbox and commented:

LOL Ok, so I can share this one because the Majority Report doesn't use foul language this time! Al Franken (whom I have never liked) and Bill O'Reilly (whom I find to be extremely arrogant and rude) are on here, where Franken is calling O'Reilly out on something that wasn't true at all. Thank you to reasonablyliberal for sharing this! ~ nanarhonda ~ copyright 2015

February 27 - Comedy of Errors

Murphy’s Law says, “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.” Write about a time everything did — fiction encouraged here, too!
Bonus assignment: do you keep a notebook next to your bed? 35 more words

365 Days Of Writing Prompts

“It Hath Been Sung at Festivals”: More Reflections from Our Festival Friends

By Folger Education

The testimonials keep coming in, and they’re so much more compelling than anything we could say about the Secondary School Shakespeare Festival. Thank you, festival friends! 443 more words

Shakespeare

A Year in Shakespeare: The Comedy of Errors

After reading Measure for Measure last week in a heavily annotated scholarly edition, I thought I’d take a new tack for The Comedy of Errors and read something designed for pleasure rather than education. 719 more words

Shakespeare