Tags » Derek Thomas

God-Breathed Scripture Demands Expository Preaching (via Derek Thomas)

God-breathed Scripture demands the preacher to proclaim what the text says, not use the text to illustrate their thoughts and theme.
From Derek Thomas: 246 more words

Bible

A property-renting democracy? Cornwall's landlord MPs

During the Commons debate on the Government’s bill to make social housing history a Labour MP proposed an amendment. This wanted new rules to force landlords to ensure houses were fit for human habitation. 360 more words

His Steadfast Love Endures Forever

This year was my first Thanksgiving away from home, so my roommates and a bunch of classmates got together and threw a “Friendsgiving.” My favorite part of the day was when we all recited the classic refrain “His Steadfast Love Endures Forever” form Psalm 136. 3,216 more words

Laurie's Updates

God, Adam, and You: Biblical Creation Defended and Applied

Status: Available

Book Description

What difference does Adam make? The answer, to many Christians today, is “not much.”

Adam, we are told, is a mythological figure who can safely be abandoned without compromising the authority and infallibility of Scripture. 299 more words

Reformed Theology

God, Adam, and You (review)

God, Adam, and You: Biblical Creation Defended and Applied. Edited by Richard D. Phillips. Philipsburg: Presbyterian & Reformed, 2015. 210 pages. $14.99.

Church leaders must be noticing something. 512 more words

Theistic Evolution

Let's study Galatians

Paul’s letter to the churches in Galatia seems to burst on the reader like a sudden storm. The issues it raises still generate controversy, even after two thousand years of church history. 88 more words

Bible Study

6 Advantages of Consecutive Expository Preaching

While it is, of course, possible (and sometimes desirable) to preach expository sermons textually—in Romans this week, in the Psalms the next, and in Haggai the following week—there is something about the very discipline of exposition that makes it impossible not to pick up the threads of an argument that begins in one chapter and runs on for several more. 104 more words

Minister