Tags » Diplomatic History

Charles Krauthammer: Worse than we could have imagined

Washington Post — When you write a column, as did I two weeks ago, headlined “The worst agreement in U.S. diplomatic history,” you don’t expect to revisit the issue. 93 more words

Politics

Iran, World Powers Agree to Historic Deal in Vienna

Posted: 1:31 am  PDT
Updated: 1:29 pm PDT
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Met with @FedericaMog and @JZarif this AM. Still have difficult issues to resolve. #IranTalksVienna

— John Kerry (@JohnKerry) …

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Foreign Affairs

Charles Krauthammer: Iran and the worst agreement in U.S. diplomatic history

Washington Post — The devil is not in the details. It’s in the entire conception of the Iran deal, animated by President Obama’s fantastical belief that he, uniquely, could achieve detente with a fanatical Islamist regime whose foundational purpose is to cleanse the Middle East of the poisonous corruption of American power and influence. 66 more words

President Obama

Washington and Havana Formally Restores Diplomatic Relations After 54 Years

Posted: 2:17 pm  EDT
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According to history.state.gov, the United States remained in Cuba as an occupying power until the Republic of Cuba was formally installed on May 19, 1902 following the defeat of Spain in 1898.   380 more words

State Department

MPs and Waterloo

To mark today’s anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, Dr Philip Salmon, Editor of the Victorian Commons, explores the the impact of the battle’s veterans on the House of Commons… 529 more words

19th Century History

Posted: 2:36 am EDT
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“I remain mystified by the fact that the use of a private e-mail account apparently went either unnoticed or unremarked upon during the four-year tenure in office of the former secretary” […] ”Simply put, where was everyone?

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State Department

Diem's Final Failure

In Philip Catton’s Diem’s Final Failure, the author examines the government of President Ngo Dinh Diem in South Vietnam from 1954 – 1963 and argues that the conflict between the United States and the Diem government resulted from a “clash of visions” on the methods of modernization and nation building (Catton 2). 725 more words

War