Tags » Earl Of Oxford

We need a new paradigm

There are several factors that continue to block our access to the truth about the Shakespeare authorship, and until these have been overcome, or better, simply bypassed, we will continue to be without the kind of access to archives and established publishers that we deserve. 2,149 more words

Shakespeare Authorship

The Book with "100 Reasons" for Oxford's Authorship is Now Available on Kindle

100 Reasons Shake-speare was the Earl of Oxford has finally arrived at Amazon on Kindle. This move has required a reduction in the number of illustrations, which, however, have become sharper. 215 more words

Authorship

Review of "100 Reasons" by Walter Hurst in the Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter

“How do you write a review about a book you enjoyed so much that you literally could not put it down—even when you knew you had other work that had to be done?” 1,362 more words

Authorship

The real site of the Battle of Barnet...?

The excellent BBC series Digging for Britain, Series 5, the episode concerning the east of Britain, presented by the equally excellent Dr Alice Roberts, contained a section on the Battle of Barnet, 1471. 408 more words

Edward IV

An Agreement with "The Monument" on the Possible Dating of Sonnet 81 -- in "Brief Chronicles" for the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship

In the current Brief Chronicles (No. VII, 2016, published 12 January 2017), edited by Roger Stritmatter, PhD with Michael Delahoyde, PhD for the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship, researchers Elke Brackmann and Robert Detobel suggest a possible dating of Sonnet 81 that coincides with the one expressed in… 482 more words

Authorship

Did Shakspere write Shakespeare?

One of the ongoing word battles between authorship scholars and academics turns on the spelling of the name Shakespeare. It’s a rather odd name, actually, when compared with most English names from that period. 2,898 more words

Shakespeare Authorship

Oxford, Vitruvius, and Burbage's "round" Theatre

So far as I know, Shakespeare scholar Frances Yates (1899-1981) was the first to attempt an explanation for how a working class bloke like James Burbage came to know the classical Latin of the ancient Roman architect Vitruvius, since to her it seemed questionable that in constructing his big public theater in 1576, Burbage, all on his own, could have come up with something that matched so closely with ancient Roman theater designs from the first century BC. 1,968 more words

Shakespeare Authorship