Tags » Economic Inequality

Donald Trump Should Withdraw from the Presidential Race

Like many other fiscal conservatives I have been overlooking Donald Trump’s moral failings in hopes of electing a president who would be able to disrupt our current economic stagnation and move the U.S. 335 more words

Jack Heidel

"Too Much Capital In Too Few Hands": Populist Backlash Will Keep Increasing As Inequality Continues To Rise

Listen to a typical center-left Democrat, and you’ll hear rosy things about the economy. GDP growth is solid, unemployment is low, and even wages are starting to rise. 631 more words

Jobs

"The Politics Of Greed": It Is Really Important That We Get This One Right

In his op-ed titled Here’s What We Want, Bernie Sanders wrote this:

What do we want? We want an economy that is not based on uncontrollable greed, monopolistic practices and illegal behavior. 489 more words

Donald Trump

Can the U.S. Economy Do Better? II. It Won’t Be Easy

In my last post, “Can the U.S. Economy Do Better?” I laid out the view of the Hoover Institution economist John Cochrane that a few basic changes such as deep tax reform, a thorough overhaul of social programs, more educational competition and regulatory simplification would go a long way towards perking up the economy. 316 more words

Jack Heidel

Can She Fix It?

As I have recently pointed out, Hillary Clinton is now likely to be our next president.  In my last post I provided vivid evidence… 313 more words

Jack Heidel

"The Slow Pace Of Change In America": Bravo To Tubman, But U.S. Women Still Not Getting The Full $20

My apologies upfront to those cheering the announcement that Harriet Tubman will grace the front of the $20 bill, and that a few other women will eventually get similar treatment on other currency, but the announcement Wednesday by U.S. 587 more words

Economic Inequality

Five Ways to Destroy the U.S. Economy

For seven years following the end of the Great Recession in June 2009 our economy has been plodding along at an average growth rate of 2.1% per year, much more slowly than after a typical recession. 353 more words

Jack Heidel