Tags » Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Despair continues his rhetorical attack, pointing out to Redcrosse his multiple sins, including leaving Una and hooking up with Duessa. Also so recently he’s wished for death in the dungeon and the odds are, soon he is going to be in a similar predicament, so why not end all now? 195 more words

Literature

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Continuing Despair’s description – he is dressed in rags pinned down with thorns (no safety pins invented yet) and next to him lies the corpse with the knife in its chest, apparently the corpse of the unhappy Terwin. 275 more words

Literature

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Una exclaims that the Faerie Queene is indeed happy to have such a champion. Redcrosse wishes Arthur good luck in finding his lady and vows to love him second to none but Una. 157 more words

Literature

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Arthur says that God sent him here, but he is not sure. Was it God’s will or the fresh wound rancling in his breast that makes him travel? 162 more words

Literature

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Duessa ashamed flees into the desert, where she hides among the rocks. Una and both knights stay for some time in the castle to recuperate after the dramatic events, thus ending Canto 8. 294 more words

Literature

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Arthur manages to find Redcrosse, who is terribly emaciated and worn out by the three months of imprisonment. He gets him out of the cell, and Una rushes to him crying and exclaiming “How could you have found yourself in this terrible situation?” This looks like a rhetorical question to me, since Una is pretty much up to speed with everything that happened to Redcrosse, thanks to the Dwarf. 362 more words

Literature

Next Meeting - Wednesday 26 August 2015

At our next meeting on Wednesday 26 August, (Howard Building 5423) Arun Cheta will be presenting elements of his PhD research.

Summary

I will focus on the relationship between Thomas Nashe and a much larger figure in the renaissance world – Edmund Spenser.  73 more words