Tags » Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

The fight seems to take a decisive turn when Sansjoy looks at his brother’s shield hanging on the tree. He addresses the ghost of his brother, saying something to the extent “I am going to send your killer to you to tell you that I’ve won your shield back!” and gives Redcrosse two strong blows on the head. 164 more words

Literature

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Canto 5 begins, as all cantos of this poem, with a short epigram summarizing its contents. I guess the concept of a spoiler was unknown to Spenser. 282 more words

Literature

Sunday Morning --- Victoriana of the Week

This weeks painting is “Acrasia”, by John Melhuish Strudwick. As you might guess from the style of the painting, Strudwick was influenced by Sir Edward Burne-Jones, with whom he spent time as a studio assistant. 176 more words

Art

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Redcrosse throws his gauntlet to Sansjoy, and then they all go to a big party organized by Gluttony. They have a good time until Sloth, who is the chamberlain (literally – responsible for bed-chambers) puts them to sleep. 138 more words

Literature

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Wrath is dressed in blood-stained clothes. Even though he is often sorry about his crimes committed in a fit of passion, he cannot stop himself. His spleen is enlarged (since spleen was considered to be the seat of passion), he is shaking with palsy and he is suffering from something Spenser calls “Saint Fraunces fire”. 181 more words

Literature

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Lechery is dressed in a green dress (colour of jealousy) and holding a burning heart in his hand. He is suffering, appropriately enough, from syphilis, which is not named but the description leaves no doubt: it’s the disease “that rots the marrow, and consumes the braine” (I 4: 233). 163 more words

Literature

Edmund Spenser - The Faerie Queene (ctd.)

Lucifera calls on her coach, which is as impressive and rich as Juno’s coach. Unfortunately, the six animals that pull the coach are not as wonderful. 296 more words

Literature