Tags » Edwardian Era

Historical Suffragettes: Ms Pankhurst

I’m a little late on the posting schedule today, but I really wanted to think this blog post through. I might come across as having an adamantly single view on this topic, but I promise you, I’m open to discussion! 863 more words

Feminism

Mail Time! (Warning: Photo Heavy Post)

I love when fun packages arrive in the mail. I skip round the house (not literally, I have a small ranch house, so there’s not really enough space to skip around, lol) singing the old Blue’s Clues Mail Time song. 384 more words

Planning Phase

Candy Candy Anime Rambling: Fashion in the Candy Candy Anime by Lucia R.

Happy Friday, all!

I’m excited not only because the weekend  is upon us but also for this post, a brand new article published after months of drought. 913 more words

Candy Candy

My Fave 5 Friday - Blogger Made Costumes

Hi Friday, everyone! It’s the end of the work week, and I’m sure we are all ready for the weekend, so what better way to end the week than with some awesome costumes! 422 more words

Victorian Era

Chapter One: Children's Stories

It may seem odd that I would make children’s classics the starting point for this journey; but really where do we all start reading classics? Do we jump right in to Chaucer and Milton? 539 more words

Children's Stories

Making Herstory: The troubling and toxic phenomenon of anti-feminism.

You’d think one wouldn’t have to justify a movement that promotes the welfare of 50% of the world’s population. But here I am.

Last week I mentioned that the wave we are currently going through is facing backlash and obstruction in a surprisingly similar fashion to its predecessors. 1,026 more words

Feminism

New Database of Edwardian-Era Postcards

Now available: an online archive of Edwardian-era postcards. “Described by researchers at Lancaster University as the social media of its day, with features of Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, Messenger and SMS texts, the ‘hands-on’ database includes 1000 postcards, written and sent between 1901 and 1910, together with transcriptions and carefully researched historical data about the people who wrote and received the fascinating cards.”

New Resources