Tags » English Literature

The Schooldays of Jesus, J.M Coetzee

We join the central character from Coetzee’s 2013 novel, The Childhood of Jesus, as he strives to adapt to his new country; he continues to question, he continues to inspire and frustrate. 229 more words


"Literature's Role in a Digital Tomorrow": First Publication in the Glasgow Guardian

I have recently published my first article in the Glasgow Guardian (the University of Glasgow’s student newspaper) as a features contributor, titled “Literature’s Role in a Digital Tomorrow: Glasgow University is still a “World of Words”, an interview with Dr. 378 more words

A Short Analysis of William Blake's 'The Sick Rose'

A critical reading of a classic short poem

‘The Sick Rose’ was published in William Blake’s Songs of Experience in 1794. The poem remains a baffling one, with Blake’s precise meaning difficult to ascertain. 530 more words


A Short Analysis of T. S. Eliot's 'A Game of Chess'

A reading of the second part of The Waste Land

‘A Game of Chess’ is the second section of T. S. Eliot’s 1922 poem The Waste Land… 1,198 more words


Why the criticism of Bob Dylan’s Nobel win is absurd - Sudipto Das

There are many other deserving lyricists, it may be argued. Why Dylan? That’s an argument that doesn’t quite make sense. It’s like two kids fighting, each claiming her mother is more beautiful than the other’s. 2,106 more words

Nobel Prize

The Truth About Studying English

Hey guys!

So if you didn’t already know, I’m in my second year at university studying a degree in English with American Literature. When I chose to do this course, I thought it would be a mix of authors and writers, ranging from Shakespeare to Steinbeck- which, to an extent, it is. 542 more words

The Storyteller

A Short Analysis of Seamus Heaney's 'Digging'

A reading of a classic Heaney poem

‘Digging’ appeared in Seamus Heaney’s first collection, Death of a Naturalist, in 1966. Like a number of the sonnets by Tony Harrison – who was born two years before Heaney – ‘Digging’ is about a poet-son’s relationship with his father and the sense that the working-class son, by choosing the vocation of the poet (but then who chooses it? 597 more words