Tags » Etymology

A History of A*

According to the ONLINE ETYMOLOGY DICTIONARY**, the etymological “definition” of the indefinite article “a” is:

a form of an used before consonants, mid-12c., a weakened form of Old English an “one” (see an).

331 more words
Writing

Etymology Of The Day -Brooding/broody​: Pensive

Brooding / Broody: Two different words with different meanings, yet they both rest upon a common part – ‘brood’ how did these two come to be, and are they connected? 177 more words

Etymology

To the Bar

Everyone knows what a barista is. We all have been to Starbucks at least once in our lifetime, either with a friend or addicted selves. But, where did… 353 more words

Etymology

scum

A layer of dirt or froth on the top of a liquid. Middle Low German “schum”=foam, froth < Germanic “*skumo-” < Proto-Indo-European “*skeu-“=to cover.

Etymology

Stop using the pejorative term "gypsy"

Greetings! Now that I’m underemployed once again, I can come back to my blog to espouse opinions on the internet, as is my wont. Today’s post is inspired by an image I saw on Facebook, which decried the pejorative term “gypsy.” I’m on a perpetual quest to shed pejoratives and slurs and words that I have no call to use from my vocabulary, so this one got me thinking. 583 more words

Bohemia

Elicit and illicit – Similar, but completely different.

Elicit and illicit; two similar words with very different meanings, is the shared ‘licit’ part of a shared history?

Elicit – means to cause or provoke and the first record we have of it is from the 1640s when it entered our language from French. 214 more words

Etymology

inert

Not moving; lacking energy. Latin “inertem”=unskilled, sluggish < “in-“=without/not + “artem”=skill, application.

Etymology