Tags » False Dichotomies

Simon Jacobson on "honouring thy father and thy mother"

The commandment to “honour thy father and thy mother” is one that, one would like to hope, is usually relatively straightforward. Many of us (most of us?) can fairly easily point to evidence our parents are or were nurturing, supportive and loving … but one must always acknowledge those who cannot. 1,368 more words

Commonplace Book

It's NOT just a heart issue: On school shootings and false choices

Imagine a particular township in which literally hundreds of people were dying every year from heart attacks.

Sadly, in this one municipality (unlike the others that surrounded it), the cardiac fatalities had become so common that they now went largely unnoticed, except for the extreme exceptions—or when the paramedics came to your front door. 806 more words

Culture

Two Views on the Nature of Language: Nietzsche and Auden

“That for which we find words is already dead in our hearts,” says Nietzsche. “There is a kind of contempt in the act of speaking… 2,105 more words

Literary Studies/Criticism/Theory

Seamus Sweeney reblogged this on Séamus Sweeney and commented:

I drew on this blog post for much of the post I just wrote, so it seems only fair to highlight it here by reblogging. I have just discovered this blog which seems to have a lot of good stuff worth exploring....

“Shouting about humankind being part of nature may mask a fear that it is nothing of the sort.”

From Peter Reason’s “In Search of Grace”, a passage on a theme that has often occurred to me. Philosophically, one can unpick the concept of “nature” and any separation between the world of human activity and the natural world. 213 more words

Commonplace Book

Do you want to see what human eyes have never seen?

Do you want to see what human eyes have never seen?
Look at the moon
Do you want to hear what ears have never heard?

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Commonplace Book

The Empathy of St. Francis

There was a discussion in a First Grade religion class focused on St. Francis of Assisi. After school, a First Grader came home very excited about what he had learned and blurted out to his mother, “Guess what, Mommy? 1,441 more words

Seamus Sweeney reblogged this on Séamus Sweeney and commented:

A wonderful essay by DeForest London on St Francis (of Assisi) and the power of empathy:

"When people were around St. Francis and his empathy, they felt this lightening of their burden because they knew (they felt deeply) that someone was sharing the load with them. They found rest for their world-weary souls in a similar way that the followers of Jesus found rest in his empathetic presence. The beauty of this quality is that we do not have to be especially intelligent or wise or wealthy to cultivate it. In fact, according to the Gospel, this quality often eludes the wealthy and the wise. Jesus says, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants.” The Greek word for “infants” is nepios, which can also be translated as someone who does not speak or someone who needs training (which sounds kind of like our pets). Empathy is a quality available to all and is often found among those from whom we least expect it (or don’t expect it at all). Empathy is available not only to humans, but to all sentient beings (Francis might even say to all of creation). Personally, one of my most profound experiences of empathy was not from a human. Several years ago, my cat, Frisky London, passed away at the ripe old age of 20 (which would be equivalent to about 96 in human years). Before she passed away, she comforted me. The last time I said goodbye to her at my parent’s house, I cried, knowing that I might not see her ever again. She was not really eating or drinking and was very unresponsive. But when I cried, I cried into her beautiful fur coat. And as I was oozing out my sadness onto her, she responded by licking my tears. And, I felt, very powerfully, that she knew she was going to die and she knew that I was going to miss her and she showed me empathy and she comforted me and she eased my sadness. Frisky was my St. Francis."

Incongruent dichotomies: Logical vs. emotional

TL;DR

One should always, in my opinion, be suspicious of incongruent dichotomies. I show how the false dichotomy of logic vs. emotion (thinking vs. feeling) is used to discredit groups of people and justify laziness. 2,283 more words

Essays