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Did Jefferson Struggle With the Louisiana Purchase Decision?

“Despite Jefferson’s great enthusiasm for the purchase, he hesitated to send the treaty to the Senate for ratification. Being a firm believer in limited government and strict construction of the Constitution, Jefferson doubted that the federal government had the constitutional right either to acquire foreign territory or, more important, to incorporate it into the Union. 257 more words

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What Changes Did Jefferson Make to the National Government?

“The Republicans in fact meant to have an insignificant national government. The federal government, Jefferson declared in his first message to Congress in 1801, was ‘charged with the external and mutual relations only of these states.’ All the rest—the ‘principal care of our persons, our property, and our reputation, constituting the great field of human concerns’—were to be left to the states, which Jefferson thought were the best governments in the world… The inherited Federalist governmental establishment was small even by eighteenth-century European standards… Nevertheless, in Jefferson’s eyes, this tiny federal bureaucracy had become ‘too complicated, too expensive,’ and 411 more words

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Why Was the Election of 1800 Important?

“Jefferson’s narrow victory in the presidential election of 1800 confirmed the changing course of national developments. Jefferson received seventy-three electoral votes to the sixty-five of the Federalist candidate, John Adams. 448 more words

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What Was America's Political Climate Post-John Adams?

“The Federalists of the 1790s stood in the way of popular democracy as it was emerging in the United States, and thus they became heretics opposed to the developing democratic faith. 188 more words

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What Were the "XYZ Affair" and "Quasi-War" With France?

“By the middle of 1797 the United States and France were on the verge of war with one another in much the same way that the United States and Britain had been in 1794… To Jefferson and the Republicans, war with France was inconceivable and had to be avoided at almost any cost… Thus when the American envoys arrived in Paris in October 1797, they were met with a series of humiliating conditions before negotiations could even begin. 548 more words

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Why Was the Election of 1796 Important?

“Parties in 1796 were still distasteful, and most people were reluctant to put party loyalties ahead of regional, state, or personal loyalties. Hence the leading contenders for the presidency—John Adams and Thomas Jefferson—had to appear as if they were indifferent to the office. 258 more words

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What Was America's Political Climate Post-Washington?

“With no George Washington in office to calm the emotions and reconcile the clashing interests, sectional antagonisms became more and more bitter. Some leaders began predicting a French invasion of the United States and envisioned once again a breakup of the Union. 138 more words

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