Tags » Francis Tumblety

Quacks Pretend To Cure Other Men's Disorders But Rarely Find A Cure For Their Own - Part Fourteen

Francis Tumblety (1833 – 1903)

The next quack to come under our microscope led what may be termed in certain circles a colourful life. It is not certain which side of the Atlantic he was born on but coming from Irish stock and definitely being in the US in 1850 (he appears in the American census of that year with his ten siblings) his family may well have migrated as a consequence of the Potato Famine. 563 more words

History

Belleville, Ontario

Here are a few interesting photos I took on a Haunted Tour in Belleville, Ontario.  They were taken in an alley where Jack the Ripper suspect… 85 more words

Ontario

Blow-ins

… from the line-up parade

Out-of-towners:

Scotsman William Henry Bury was hanged following the murder of his wife in 1889.  The autopsy carried out on his wife’s body revealed death by strangulation and that she had deep stab wounds to her abdomen inflicted post-mortem. 467 more words

Whitechapel

'Stache the ripper

This tattoo is of Francis Tumblety, a man who was once believed to be Jack the Ripper. Potentially being a serial killer aside, the man had a fabulous lip tickler. 16 more words

Tattoos

Jack the Ripper Fact-Fridays

If you are one of those who believes that the Ripper killings could have happened in America, then you can narrow your suspects down to three men: Francis Tumblety, George Chapman and James Kelly.   15 more words

Jack The Ripper

On the Heels of Jack the Ripper

On the plane ride across the Atlantic I read Peter Ackroyd’s London: The Biography. I figured seeing as I was going to be spending the next eight days there, it might be nice to arm myself with some honest to God history. 2,351 more words

Was a Brooklyn doctor really Jack the Ripper?

Meet Francis Tumblety, a quack “Indian Herb” doctor who opened shop in the 1860s first in Brooklyn and then in Manhattan. Some Ripperologists think he may be the homicidal maniac who murdered at least 11 women in London’s East End in 1888. 159 more words

Brooklyn