Tags » G. K. Beale

The Storyline of the Bible

The OT storyline that I posit as the basis for the NT storyline is this: The Old Testament is the story of God, who progressively reestablishes his new-creational kingdom out of chaos over a sinful people by his word and Spirit through promise, covenant, and redemption, resulting in worldwide commission to the faithful to advance this kingdom and judgment (defeat or exile) for the unfaithful, unto his glory. 78 more words

Gospel

Revelation Quote

And is it possible, if we sought to model our own worship, whether individual or corporate, on what is portrayed here, that, as we declared the same truths about God as the heavenly beings do, the same Holy Spirit who is pictured as being before the throne would deepen and transform our understanding of God and His glory in a way that touches our whole being, in its spiritual, intellectual, emotional, and even physical components?  10 more words

Christianity

Revelation Quote

All heavenly beings find their significance in their placement around the throne, and all the earth’s inhabitants are judged on the basis of their attitude to God’s claim to rule over them from this throne. 10 more words

Christianity

IMITATION – the way of learning the Way

We all know that children learn by imitating their caregivers, whether it be parents, grandparents, day care workers, or anyone else who provides care and input into their lives.  672 more words

Blogging Beale | The Temple and the Church's Mission | Eden as Temple, Chapter 2, Pt. 3

This post continues the discussion of G.K. Beale’s book, The Temple and the Church’s Mission. As we finish summarizing chapter two, we will look at Beale’s arguments for believing that Eden was a temple mountain-sanctuary. 516 more words

Blogging Beale | The Temple and the Church's Mission | Chapter 2, Pt. 2

This is the third installment of the series, Blogging Beale, working through G.K. Beale’s work, The Temple and the Church’s Mission.  From now on, the posts will be in Q&A format, summarizing Beale’s arguments. 507 more words