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A Universal Basic Income That Makes It Feasible To Avoid Working Is Immoral

Delhi seminar last week discussed what intellectuals see as the next great idea for social revolution: a Universal Basic Income (UBI). Prof Pranab Bardhan proposed a UBI of Rs 10,000 a year as a citizen’s right, to be funded by raising a whopping 10% of GDP by eliminating tax breaks and wasteful subsidies. 67 more words

Industrial Trucks and their Impact on the US Economy

Industrial trucks and forklifts sales are directly tied to our economy. When our economy does well, more forklifts are required to move the goods ordered by customers and end-users. 229 more words

Akron

Forklifts and Economics, the Impact

Industrial trucks and forklifts sales are directly tied to our economy. When our economy does well, more forklifts are required to move the goods ordered by customers and end-users. 229 more words

Chicago

M2 Money Growth Declines To 20 Month Low (What Happens To Wage Growth?)

Real median household income, one measure of American household prosperity, peaked in 1999, fell slightly in 2000, then declined in the early 2000s only to hit decade-peak in 2007. 323 more words

Greece is several economic tragedies rolled into one

Over the past decade, Greece has experienced an economic downturn unlike any other in recent history. The ugly combination of the global financial crisis, fiscal irresponsibility, and political instability has savaged almost every aspect of the Greek economy. 361 more words

Here's the True Definition of a Recession — It's Not About GDP

According to the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), the institution that dates the peaks and troughs of the business cycles,

A recession is a significant decline in economic activity spread across the economy, lasting more than a few months, normally visible in real GDP, real income, employment, industrial production, and wholesale-retail sales.

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The Hangover: US Economy Still Suffers From The Housing Bubble Burst And Bad DC Policies

Bloomberg View has an interesting editorial entitled, “Yes, Financial Crises Do Bring Hangovers.”

In an essay making the rounds this week, four prominent academic economists and former government officials argue that something needs to be done to accelerate the pace of what they call “the weakest economic expansion since World War II.” Their recipe for speeding things up is lower taxes and less entitlement spending, and I’m not going to get into whether that’s really such a good idea, in part because I imagine lots of other people will take up that argument and in part because I just don’t know the answer. 333 more words