Tags » Gene Duplication

On the creepy parallel between gene duplication and oppression - as inspired by a passage from Karen Armstrong's "Fields of Blood."

“If, as has been shown for ethnographically documented hunter-gatherers, women in the most meat-dependent foraging societies spend less time procuring food and more time engaged in the production of technology and performing nonsubsistence tasks, then Clovis women likely spent the majority of their time not gathering plants.  1,835 more words

All Posts

How the snake got his venom

Aside from its supposed complexity (see previous post), one of the reasons I started working on snake venom was the apparent prevalence of gene duplication and neofunctionalisation (where a gene is duplicated and one of the duplicates evolves an entirely new role) in the evolution of venom toxins. 713 more words

Evolution

Episode 12 - EGGS: The evolution of genes, genomes and systems

https://lifesciencespodcast.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/episode-12-series-3-eggs.mp3

For many of us, when we think about evolution, our thoughts are automatically drawn to the fascinating range of phenotypic adaptations resulting from Darwinian selection. 530 more words

New genes, new tricks

I’ve previously written about the birth of new genes. Since new genes are cool, and I just found two recent papers on them, you’re getting more of them. 1,354 more words

Evolution

Starch gave canine evolution something to chew on

A dog’s dinner can be scraps from the table, a juicy bone or an incredibly unlucky piece of homework.  This omnivory has been present since their domestication around 15,000 years ago, just before humans developed agriculture.   1,007 more words

Gene Duplication

Growing fast without zero population growth genes

If you had aphids on your plants, you have undoubtedly verified their fast growing rate. Indeed, aphids can reproduce quickly and it has been calculated that under ideal conditions (such as absence of predators, parasites, pathogens and benign climatic conditions, especially including optimal temperatures of 20 -25 °C), a single asexual female could in theory produce 7.6×1028 offspring in a single growing season (Harrington 1994). 731 more words

Aphid Genetics