Tags » Getting Published

Reflective Writing:Editors

Never-ending Revisions 

I mentioned in an earlier post (https://publishalice.wordpress.com/2016/07/03/blog-post-title-2/) that I was asked to write a blog on my research methodology  for the Nonreligion and Secularity Research Network (NSRN). 247 more words

Reflective Writing

Guest Post: Interview With Junior Agent Saba Sulaiman

Veteran Write Naked contributor Dorit Sasson is back! Last time Dorit interviewed author/freelancer Hope Clark on writing income advice. Today, Dorit (whose memoir is a finalist for multiple awards) is back with another interview. 746 more words

Writing

$39,000 Short Story Prize: The Sunday Times Short Story Awards

Entering the 2017 Award
http://shortstoryaward.co.uk/entries

Entries are now open for the 2017 Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award.

The prize, worth £30,000 to the winner, is an international award, founded in 2010, that is open to any story of up to 6,000 words written in English. 162 more words

Thoughts

Proud of my book, but do I want to buy 200 copies?

In addition to being a partner with History Press in the publication of my book, I am also a customer. I ordered copies of my book from them recently, after refusing several earlier sales pitches. 246 more words

Life As A Writer

The Sagging Middle

I’ve reached the middle section of my YA novel.  As a writer, I’m a pantser, meaning I write by the seat of my pants. I love writing this way. 404 more words

Process

Print-on-Demand: The Bad

This is the second post in a series about print-on-demand publishing: namely programs like CreateSpace that allow authors to upload, format, and publish their books in both ebook format and a hard-copy version that is printed as customers purchase it. 1,356 more words

Getting Published

Know Your Rights: 7 Terms Every Writer Should Learn

It’s every writer’s dream to see their work in print. To have spent years of their lives putting together the perfect work or months coming up with the perfect idea for publishing or syndication and finally see that hard work pay off with an acceptance letter. 1,617 more words

Literature Effect Blog