Tags » Green Chemistry

Recycling Perovskite Solar Cells

By Judy Tsao, Member-at-Large for the GCI

Solar energy is arguably the most abundant and environmentally friendly source of energy that we have access to. In fact, crystalline silicon solar cells have been employed in parts of the world at a comparable cost to the price of electricity derived from fossil fuels.1 The large-scale employment of solar cells, however, remains challenging as the efficiency of existing solar cells still needs to be improved significantly. 582 more words

Green Chemistry

Interview with NUS-Prof Yan Ning

Hey! Here is an interview with a young professor! Hope that his interview will excite you! =)

NUS

Green Chemistry Principle #7: Use of Renewable Feedstocks

By Trevor Janes, Member-at-Large for the GCI

7. A raw material or feedstock should be renewable rather than depleting whenever technically and economically practicable.

In Video #7, Yuchan and Ian help us understand what a raw material or feedstock is, and why we need to choose feedstocks which are renewable. 602 more words

Green Chemistry

Green Polymer Chemistry: Approaches, Challenges, Opportunity

By Hyungjun Cho, Member-at-large for the GCI

I was recently inspired by an episode of podcast by NPR’s Planet Money called Oil #4: How Oil Got Into Everything… 727 more words

Green Chemistry

UofT Demonstrates its Commitment to Sustainable Chemistry

“We’re very pleased and proud to announce that the Chemistry Department has recently joined the Green Chemistry Commitment (GCC)!” – Dr. Andy Dicks, University of Toronto, Associate Professor… 443 more words

Green Chemistry

Identifying "green chemistry" industrialisation barriers through case-studies

Nitesh Mehta

Convenor of Industrial Green Chemistry World and Founder – Director of Newreka Green Synth Technologies Pvt Ltd

nitesh.mehta@newreka.co.in

Identifying “green chemistry” industrialisation barriers through case-studies… 35 more words

Green Syn

Just Shut It!

By James LaFortune and Shawn Postle, Members-at-large for the GCI

The Green Chemistry Initiative (GCI) and the University of Toronto constantly strive to reduce the environmental impact inherent to research in the Chemistry Department.  405 more words

Green Chemistry