Tags » Hakuho

July 2016, Day 15, Hakuho v Harumafuji

All Harumafuji has to do to win his eighth career upper-division championship is beat the greatest sumo wrestler of all time. No biggie. Both Yokozuna turn in a spirited performance, a very technical bout of arm position, posture, and belt grips. 141 more words

Sumo

July 2016, Day 14, Hakuho v Kisenosato

Kisenosato stays in the title hunt by the skin of his teeth. After a weak tachiai where he basically absorbs Hakuho’s charge without any offense of his own, he’s able to take advantage of a rarely over-extended Hakuho who lets his upper body get ahead of his feet. 108 more words

Sumo

July 2016, Day 13, Hakuho v Goeido

If Hakuho wants to have a chance at winning the tournament, he needs to win the last three days. He can’t count on Harumafuji to drop a bout with so much on the line. 104 more words

Sumo

July 2016, Day 12, Hakuho v Terunofuji

Terunofuji sidesteps Hakuho at the tachiai and takes a dominant position, but the referee calls them back – he didn’t think Hakuho put his hands down properly. 123 more words

Sumo

July 2016, Day 10, Hakuho v Tochinoshin

Tochinoshin has wrestled against Hakuho 23 times, and lost 23 times. The pattern remains unbroken today even against a Hakuho who doesn’t look fully fit. His tachiai is tentative, and Tochinoshin manages to throw him around the ring and even lift him off the ground. 108 more words

Sumo

July 2016, Day 9, Hakuho v Ikioi

Up is down, black is white, night is day, banana is pumpernickel! Hakuho loses so rarely that when it happens it’s always surprising. After a soft tachiai against Ikioi he resorts again to pulling backwards, and his opponent looks completely gobsmacked to still be standing. 79 more words

Sumo

July 2016, Day 8, Hakuho v Shohozan

Numbers-wise, Hakuho’s been as dominant this tournament as you’d expect. But he’s been winning going backwards more often than usual, resorting to pulling and dodging techniques under the pressure of his opponents’ attacks. 43 more words

Sumo