Tags » Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt

A few weeks ago, my undergraduate seminar spent the week reading selections from Hannah Arendt. I’m no Arendt specialist, of course, and anyway the specialist issues weren’t the point– the seminar was about the Enlightenment tradition and what happened to it over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 1,052 more words

I’m a Parent, Therefore I Am: Cartesian-Inspired Thoughts on the Value of Caregiving

I’ve had a rather major life change recently. My youngest child has started school. Thus, for the first time in 16 and ½ years, I do not have a pre-schooler in the house. 2,342 more words

Representation as Misrepresentation: Ethics as the Source of Evil

NB: The definition of ‘evil’ that will be used henceforth is “immoral and malevolent.” For the sake of argumentation, I will not address the question of what “evil” is beyond this definition. 1,595 more words

Philosophy

A Prof’s Recommended Reading #4: “Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil” by Hannah Arendt

“Evil in the Third Reich had lost the quality by which most people recognize it—the quality of temptation.”

It would be remiss of me if I didn’t admit that Hannah Arendt’s…

1,907 more words
Reading Challenge

Snippet: Maria Ángeles Cabré's "Countercurrently..." - on eight female writers (non-fiction)

Maria Ángeles Cabré, A contracorriente. Escritoras a la intemperie del siglo XX , 2015, 280 p.

The publisher’s summary:

Quite some time ago literature ceased to be an exclusively male homeland, and today there are many female writers who populate our libraries, converting them into more plural and fertile places. 232 more words

English

No New Information on the Consequences of Nuclear Weapons?

Deconstructing Nuclear Discourse at the 2015 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference

Adapted and republished from a version published in NPT News in Review.

Many diplomatic discussions of nuclear weapons tend toward the dry and mind-numbing—perhaps by design—trying the patience of those who working for a nuclear free world. 695 more words