Tags » Hendrik Slegtenhorst

Atonement and False Prophets - The Cantatas of J.S. Bach - Cantata 136, at Trinity VIII

Cantata 136 is part of the first Leipzig cantata cycle of 1723, and makes much use of the themes of mortal hypocrisy and divine judgment. 1,305 more words

Hendrik Slegtenhorst

Poetic Justice Moves to Downtown Vancouver

Poetic Justice – 550 poets since 2010 – makes a great move Oct 22, 2 pm, from New Westminster to the Vancouver Public Library in downtown Vancouver.

Hendrik Slegtenhorst

Bach's Cantata 39 at Trinity I - The Moral Worth of Riches

The opening chorus of cantata 39, (Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot  — Break thy bread for the hungry) is a splendid movement, with exceptional writing in the voices, and a fascinating part in the bass. 30 more words

Hendrik Slegtenhorst

Proust: From The Guermantes Way - Chapter One

… our cruellest adversaries are not those who contradict and try to convince us, but those who magnify or invent reports which are liable to distress us, taking care not to give them any appearance of justification which might lessen our pain and perhaps give us some slight regard for an attitude which they make a point of displaying to us, to complete our torment, as being at once terrible and triumphant. 670 more words

Hendrik Slegtenhorst

Henri Vieuxtemps - Violin Concerto 4 in d, Op. 31 (1850)

The Belgian Henri Vieuxtemps, who re-introduced Beethoven’s violin concerto to the world, wrote seven violin concertos for his own use, of which the most interesting is the 4th. 82 more words

Hendrik Slegtenhorst

The Only Street in Paris - Life on the Rue des Martyrs - Elaine Sciolino (2016)

It is a good book. It tells about neighbourhood; its present, its history; religion and community; food, coffee, wine, greengrocers, fishmongers, charcuteries, cheesemongers; art, and the art of living. 389 more words

Hendrik Slegtenhorst

Bach’s Cantata 20 at Trinity I – The Moral Worth of Riches

Cantata 20 (O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort / O Eternity, you word of thunder) opens the second Leipzig cycle. It is a massive work, in two parts, beginning with a French overture, which dwells concentratedly on Eternity, the “word of thunder…, sword that bores through the soul…, beginning without end.” 11 more words

Hendrik Slegtenhorst