Tags » Herodotus

Take Off That Hat! Skull Strength and Baldness in Egypt and Persia

Herodotus, Histories 3.12

“The heads of the Persians are so weak that, if you were to toss a single pebble at one, you would make a hole in it. 119 more words

The Battle of Fennel Bay: Myths and More Myths

Pearseus: Endgame, the nail-biting (if I do say so myself) conclusion to the Pearseus series, ends not with a whimper, but with a bang. With quite a lot of bangs, in fact, the greatest of which occur during the… 723 more words

My Scifi-Fantasy Work

History Lessons

After Athens and Sparta led the Greeks in battle against the mammoth forces of Persia and won the battle of Marathon — where Herodotus estimates that they were outnumbered as much as 10 to 1, the Greeks formed the Delian league which exacted tribute from the various Greek City-States too help build Greek forces against possible future attacks. 747 more words

Hugh's Blogs

jilldennison reblogged this on Filosofa's Word and commented:

Blogger-friend Hugh Curtler is a reader and a thinker, as am I. But Hugh takes it a step farther, as he is able to see parallels that I, frankly, would miss. Often he finds those parallels in history and literature that reflect our situation today, and once again he has done so. We tend to think, not only here in the U.S., but also around the globe, that the world we are living in today is unique, that such political turmoil and angst belongs to this time and place alone. But, as Hugh has once again pointed out, history is cyclic, and the world has seen similar conditions in the past. Why does this matter, you ask? It matters because there are lessons to be learned from the mistakes of the past. And if we apply those lessons, perhaps we can avoid some of the mistakes from long ago. So, I share this excellent post by Hugh in hopes that we can all learn from a bit of ancient history. Thank you, Hugh, for your insight and for allowing me to share it.

History Lessons

After Athens and Sparta led the Greeks in battle against the mammoth forces of Persia and won the battle of Marathon — where Herodotus estimates that they were outnumbered as much as 10 to 1, the Greeks formed the Delian league which exacted tribute from the various Greek City-States too help build Greek forces against possible future attacks. 747 more words

Hugh's Blogs

Fake News in Ancient Athens

There’s been a lot of talk lately about fake news and its effect on politics, but the phenomenon is not a new one. Consider this story about how the tyrant Peisistratus seized power in Athens in 556 BCE. 579 more words

History

Father of history, father of lies

Perhaps I’m being a bit mean, picking on old Herodotus again, but he was in there in the early days, entertaining his readers with fabulous tales while peppering his accounts with phrases (Macaulay’s translation) like, ‘I went myself as an eye-witness as far as the city of Elephantine’ and ‘the Oracle of Ammon bears witness in support of my opinion that Egypt..’.  1,058 more words

History

No Dice: Murder, Starvation, and Games in Ancient Greece

Schol. D ad Il. 12.1

“Menoitios’ son Patroklos grew up in Opos in Locris but was exiled for an involuntary mistake. For he killed a child his age, the son of the memorable Amphidamas Kleisonumos, or, as some say, Aianes, because he was angry over dice. 268 more words

Greek