Tags » HFIP-Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project

NOAA Hollings Scholars present their work with AOML scientists

AOML’s three 2015 NOAA Hollings Undergraduate Scholars gave oral presentations of their work conducted with their scientist mentors during their 9-week stay internships.

  1. Kurt Hansen (University at Albany, State University of New York) – Downdrafts in Tropical Cyclones…

  2. 97 more words
HFIP-Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project

HRD seminar – Dr. Benjamin Jaimes, University of Miami, RSMAS, Department of Ocean Sciences – 16 July 2015

Dr. Jaimes presented a seminar “Enhanced Wind-Driven Downwelling Flow in Warm Oceanic Eddy Features during the Intensification of Tropical Cyclone Isaac (2012): Observations and Theory” 308 more words

HFIP-Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project

HRD mourns retired hurricane hunter pilot Dave Turner

David Lindsay Turner, 91, passed away 26 June in Jacksonville, FL.  Dave flew into hurricanes with the U. S. Navy’s VW-4 Hurricane Hunter Squadron.  After leaving the Navy in 1969, Dave joined NOAA in Miami as a civilian hurricane pilot , and flew until his retirement in 1993.   338 more words

HFIP-Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project

HRD welcomes summer student interns

Continuing our long tradition of working with students, HRD is hosting three interns this summer.  From left to right:

Joshua Wadler is a NOAA Hollings Scholar working with Rob Rogers.   132 more words

HFIP-Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project

Paper on the statistical prediction of hurricane rapid intensification released online in Weather and Forecasting

Summary: The paper describes new models to forecast the probability of when tropical cyclones may strengthen rapidly during the next 48 h when the National Hurricane Center issues watches and warnings to the public. 110 more words

HFIP-Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project

HRD seminar – Prof. U.C. Mohanty, India Institute of Technology (IIT), Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India – 16 June 2015

Prof. Mohanty presented a seminar on “Prediction of tropical cyclones over Bay of Bengal using 2013 version of HWRF system”.

Abstract

More than 80-90% of the deaths due to Tropical Cyclones (TCs) are caused by fresh water flooding and storm surge; and hence realistic TC intensity, size and structure predictions are important at landfall for disaster management. 385 more words

HFIP-Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project