Tags » Higher Ed

Unsolicited Review: "The Good Writer"

“The Good Writer: Virtue Ethics and the Teaching of Writing” by John Duffy

College English 79:3 January 2017

Gist

Teaching writing is more than teaching rules (deontology) or teaching to outcomes and purposes (consequentialism). 446 more words

First-year Writing

Mapping It Out: Social Media Strategy in Higher Ed

On February 21, 2017 I was a presenter for the 20th Annual Advising Conference at the University of Texas at Arlington. I presented twice for the conference and my first session was “Mapping It Out: Social Media Strategy in Higher Ed”. 395 more words

Curiosity

18 College Campuses That Will Make You Feel Like You’re at Hogwarts

Growing up, we all wished we could play Quidditch with Harry, study with Hermione, and find a friend as loyal as Ron. The Sorting Hat would place us in our favorite house, chocolate frogs would be our go-to midnight snack, and we’d spend our days learning charms and brewing potions. 45 more words

Editorial

Professional autonomy *as* managerial control?

There is a lot of writing out there about de-professionalization in many fields (teaching, nursing, medicine, higher ed, presumably accounting and law), as a phenomenon of corporate managerial control over once-autonomous professionals. 329 more words

Higher Ed

Study: Struggling college students get a hand to graduate

WASHINGTON (AP) — Getting through college isn’t easy, and it can be even harder for low-income and first generation students with few support resources. A new tool involving big data can help those at risk. 831 more words

Education

No, Oxford University Isn't Moving to France Because of Brexit

Higher education institutions across the U.K. are grappling with how to deal with Britain’s impending split from the European Union. Brexit threatens to cut off European Union research funding and constrict the flow of EU students, who—at many schools—make up a vital chunk of enrollment. 493 more words

Leadership

The Secrets of a Great Academic Advisor

Listen to students. Let me repeat it again — Listen to students. If you plan and dream to become an outstanding academic advisor, you must make an effort to listen to what students have to say and want to talk about. 844 more words

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