Tags » Historical Sociology

Postwar economic growth under central planning

I am posting here a little graph I plotted using data from Maddison’s standardized data on historical economic growth. The graph compares average regional per capita GDP in what can be considered two poor to middle-income developing regions after World War II, eastern Europe and Latin America. 1,110 more words

Political Economy

Citizen-peasants: Tanzanian modernity, international relations and the role of China

Darius A’Zami//International Relations//1sth of April 2015//3-4pm//Arts C133

Where, and when, is Tanzania? In conventional terms, economically it is in desperate need of modernisation – for many the epitome of ‘backwardness’ –in short, anything but modern. 207 more words

International Relations

What We Talked About At ISA: The Imperial Sociology of the "Tribe" in Afghanistan

As has been established, encounters between the coloniser and the colonised led to the creation of truths, myths, legends and identities in which the two were mutually implicated. 2,293 more words

Blog Events & Symposia

What We Talked About at ISA2015: State Transformation and the Rise of China

At this year’s ISA, Shahar Hameiri and I talked about our new research project on state transformation and rising powers, with specific reference to China. In a nutshell, we suggest that, like other states, those of so-called ‘rising powers’ are undergoing epochal transformations associated with transformations in the global political economy since the late 1970s, profoundly conditioning how they are ‘rising’. 2,543 more words

International Relations

When Ernest Met Leon

This is the fourth post in our forum on Buzan and Lawson’s The Global Transformation, from our own Jamie. The opening post, responses from… 2,486 more words

International Relations

Modernity Is Everything; Empires Are Everywhere

Jeppe Mulich brings us the third post in our forum on The Global Transformation by Buzan and Lawson. Jeppe is a doctoral candidate at the Department of History at New York University. 3,969 more words

International Relations