Tags » History Of Science

Alcide d'Orbigny and the beginning of foraminiferal studies.

During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Paris was a busy place for science. In 1794 the Reign of Terror ended with the establishment of a new government that was more supportive of the sciences. 789 more words

A is for “Anthropocene”

Today I want to pretend that I know how to read science journals, particularly a recent Nature article by scientists Simon L. Lewis and Mark A. 1,574 more words

Atlantic World

The Western Flyer: Steinbeck’s Boat, The Sea of Cortez, and the Saga of Pacific Fisheries.

By Kevin M. Bailey. The University of Chicago Press, 2015.

Reviewed by Donald Gunderson

A rich blend of philosophy, ecology, history, and first-rate literature lies behind the unassuming title for… 895 more words

Pacific Fishing History Project

A quarter-century of wonder

By now everybody has probably heard that today is the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope. I couldn’t possibly put all the links to all the news coverage in this blog entry. 455 more words

Science And Society

Writing with Violets: Parlour Chemistry c. 1800

As fascinating as I find dictionaries and the long s, I was worried that this blog just didn’t have enough color this week.  I decided to change that with the help of my backyard full of violets and a chemistry experiment in the guise of a party trick from about 1800. 626 more words

History

Rare Book Profile: Dell'anatomia, a facsimile of Leonardo da Vinci’s notebook.

Dell’anatomia by Leonardo da Vinci (Rome: TREC edizioni pregiate, 2005) is a compilation of anatomical studies that predate the great anatomy books of the sixteenth century. 344 more words

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