Tags » Homer

An Interview with Marie Bilodeau

Through the Twisted Woods interviews author, storyteller, and performance artist Marie Bilodeau about French Canadian Fairy Tales, minority languages and cultural preservation, the endurance of Fairy Tales, cultural appropriation versus translation, Celtic Fairy Tales, rewriting Fairy Tales onto modernity, the Fairy Apocalypse (or Fairypocalypse), mapping fairy stories onto new geographies, performance and storytelling of fairy tales, considering the audience for fairy tales, and magical objects in fairy tales. 25 more words

Geography

dereknewmanstille reblogged this on Over the Rainbow: Folk and Fairy Tales from the Margins and commented:

Check out this interview of Canadian author and storyteller Marie Bilodeau that was conducted by Through the Twisted Woods

Greek Lessons

It seems odd to suggest in this sophisticated (?) day and age that we might learn something from people who lived centuries before us and who were in some respects quite different. 733 more words

Hugh's Blogs

Catch the Moment - Week 21

141 | May 20, Fri – Let me tell you about Homer meeting Dolly the Pony at Fox Hollow Farm. He was SO scared! He insisted on getting off immediately the first time he got on. 523 more words

CatchtheMoment

Man Cannot Know the Future; Teachers Lie

Isocrates, Against the Sophists 13.1-3 

“If all those who try to educate were to speak truly and not to make greater promises than they can guarantee, they would not be spoken of so badly by private citizens. 208 more words

Greek

The Eye of the Storm: On the Future of Books and The Simpsons

These days, everyone loves to predict the future of publishing. Ever since Gutenberg started up that first press, the print book had no real rival. The technology was too perfect. 893 more words

Books

Lines 80-106 from “The Iliad, Book I” [A Friend Consigned to Death] by Homer

“Sleeping so? Thou hast forgotten me,
Akhilleus. Never was I uncared for
in life but am in death. Accord me burial
in all haste: let me pass the gates of Death. 227 more words

Poetry