Tags » Horace Walpole

Reading the Collections, Week 3: The Castle of Otranto

As a teenager, I spent much of my time wearing black velvet, listening to the Sisters of Mercy, and writing depressing poetry.  At university, I enrolled in classes like “Byron and Byronism” and “The Rhetoric of Monstrosity,” and devoured stories like Bram Stoker’s… 880 more words

Rare Book Collection

The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole

3 / 5 lilies

First published in 1764, The Castle of Otranto is absolutely ridiculous. Walpole himself has been deemed the “father of the Gothic,” which, I did not previously know, is a genre written in the mid to late eighteenth century, but whose stories take place hundreds of years before. 387 more words

Castle Of Otranto

The Castle of Otranto

Impressed? no.

All my life being told that The Castle of Otranto was the greatest Gothic text of all time, my hopes had been set quite high. 134 more words

American

Sir Hans Sloane, British Museum

The British Museum collection began with the intellectual curiosity of an Irish doctor called Sir Hans Sloane. He began collecting when he was working in Jamaica, as a physician to the governor. 254 more words

The Castle of Otranto - Book Review

So I’m sat on the sofa (watching Ed Milliband appear on This Morning?) and contemplating how much work I have to push through this week. Luckily I have finished this book for my lecture tomorrow! 501 more words

English Literature

Fierce Convictions - A Review

Fierce Convictions by Karen Swallow Prior is a marvelous biography of an almost unknown woman in our history.  Hannah More, a British woman born during the mid 1700’s to rather humble beginnings, she grew up with four other sisters to become, like the Bronte sisters, teachers of their own school for young ladies. 308 more words

Book Review

The Gothic Life and Times of Horace Walpole

Carrie Frye | Longreads | December 2014 | 16 minutes (4,064 words)

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As a child, Horace Walpole frequently heard it said of himself that surely he would die soon. 4,108 more words

Longreads