Tags » Horace Walpole

The Parrot, the Monkey, and the Two Rival Lovers of Madame de Choiseul | Mimi Matthews

Originally posted on Mimi Matthews.

In the late 18th century, Horace Walpole sent a letter to his friend Lady Ossory containing an entertaining anecdote about the two rival lovers of their mutual acquaintance, Françoise-Thérèse de Choiseul-Stainville.  156 more words

United Kingdom

The Parrot, the Monkey, and the Two Rival Lovers of Madame de Choiseul

In the late 18th century, Horace Walpole sent a letter to his friend Lady Ossory containing an entertaining anecdote about the two rival lovers of their mutual acquaintance, Françoise-Thérèse de Choiseul-Stainville.  628 more words

British History

Regency Personalities Series-Mary Berry

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables. … 1,111 more words

Writing

Strawberry Hill, Strawberry Fields Forever

Strawberry Hill is the Gothic Revival villa that was built in Twickenham, London by Horace Walpole from 1749. Horace was the wealthy son of  the first Britsh Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole and did not need to work, but he was an ‘man of letters’ among other things. 368 more words

Art

China in Eighteenth-Century English and Irish Literature: Representations and Tensions

Eighteenth-century Europe was fascinated by China. Growing amounts of trade and diplomacy, and the import of Chinese objects, led to an increasing awareness of the East. 253 more words

New Publications

There's No Knowing Whom We are Even Talking About

‘There was formerly a king who had three daughters – that is, he would have had three, if he had one more, but some how or other the eldest never was born. 233 more words

A trip to Strawberry Hill House

The other week my friend Susan was down from Cumbria, and we spent a happy few days in London – as someone who’s lived in the capital for seventeen years now, I never usually have the time or energy to just be a tourist in my home town, and it’s always good to have an excuse. 542 more words

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