Tags » Horace Walpole

How Democritus and Heraclites Might Have Reacted to the Trump Election

This evening after a series of minor vexations – son sick, Gamecocks clobbered, eye invaded by wayward particle – I got to thinking about Horace Walpole’s observation that “[l]ife is a tragedy for those who feel, and a comedy for those who think.” I quote Walpole when I’m teaching tragedy and ask students to offer an interpretation. 569 more words

Non-fiction

Society's Event for Members: A Visit to Strawberry Hill

Last Saturday 19 November, 10 members of SocHistColl were able to enjoy an exclusive tour of Horace Walpole’s most extraordinary creation, his villa named Strawberry Hill, guided by its Research Curator Silvia Davoli. 188 more words

News And Events

Day 137: outrageous stimulation

The morning after the election, my Mum wrote an email to various U.S. based family members with the subject heading “Commiserations!” Her tone, frankly, was more reproachful than commiserating. 1,926 more words

Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole

‘A bystander often sees more of the game than those that play.’

Title: Castle of Otranto
Author: Horace Walpole
Year Published: 1764
Pages: 125
Rating: ☆☆ 423 more words

Book Review

Catalogue of my prints or grand portraits of our most eminent countrymen, 1730

Manuscript catalogue on paper of the print collection of William Oldys, mostly written in his own hand. Most of the catalogue entries are presented in one alphabetized list and note the artist, engraver, technique, format, source (if published in a book), and major features of the print.

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Manuscripts

The Gothic

Hello, once again.

Just before Halloween, I would like to post this clip that features Professor John Bowen discussing Gothic novels and some of the key motiffs that are often seen in this genre. 81 more words

A Castle of one’s own – The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole

The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole. Date published: 1764

In essence: The true heir of Otranto must be found before the castle kills them all. 525 more words

Book Review