Tags » Hunt For Red October

Hillary Clinton -- "That Dog Won't Hunt" -- and Senator Fred Thompson

Actor and Senator Fred Thompson as Admiral Painter from “The Hunt for Red October”

Last November, one of those Americans that is so genuine, so real, that he sticks in our hearts and heads forever, passed away. 247 more words

Tilikum Crossing

Portland’s South waterfront gained an exciting, architecturally-beautiful addition several months ago.

The $135 million, 1,700-foot Tilikum Crossing is now open. It’s the first bridge to be built across the Willamette River in over two decades. 113 more words

Portland Outings

33: I'm Back! [A Recap of my October]

Hey everybody! I’m baaaaack!

As I mentioned at the end of September, I took a break from social media during the month of October. No blogging, no Facebook, no Twitter. 511 more words

The Hunt for Red October: 1990-2015: Captain Marko Ramius: So It Begins...

During my preparations for a costume party / potluck lunch at work, I made a list of the ‘big’ films that came out 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 years ago. 294 more words

Jack Ryan: Clear Hunt for Patriot Fears

Tom Clancy kind of fascinates me. He’s sort of like a pulp adventure novelist combined with military fanboyism. I once described him as Grandpa Fanfiction. Anyway, he’s been such a fixture in my life in one way or the other (my family read a lot of his books) that I can’t help but regard him with some fondness. 409 more words

Movies

What If I Was a Blogger in a Submarine movie?

Imagination … flying in like humming birds, and I am in the midst of something I did not expect.

Such imagination can be fun, good for a writer’s brain; and it shakes off the mediocrity. 557 more words

AWAKENED

Neofascist Review of K-19: The Widowmaker (directed by Kathryn Bigelow)

http://ostrovletania.blogspot.com/2010/06/neofascist-review-of-k-19-widowmaker.html


Wolfgang Petersen’s DAS BOOT is justifiably considered the best submarine movie. Though no expert of submarine films, I recall the dramatically effective ENEMY BELOW with Robert Mitchum, which had a suspenseful and ennobling final scene that left a powerful impression on me as a child. 5,231 more words