Tags » Indigo 2

A quick post: indigo leaf prints

Just to prove I’m still playing with indigo, although I’ve had less time than I thought I would.

If you’ve only got a few leaves, try leaf prints. 223 more words

Dyeing

Building a Natural Dye Reference Library, Part 4 (and part 1 of 2)

After reading– poring over, really– A Dyer’s Garden by Rita Buchanan, I used her name as a search word on Amazon, which brought up the above gem, Dyes From Nature, by the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Record, published in 1990, with Rita Buchanan as the guest editor. 370 more words

pH damages protein fibres: a test.

“Protein fibres prefer acid conditions; plant fibres prefer alkaline conditions” is a truism that I’ve repeated myself on many occasions. It’s a commonplace when discussing indigo dyeing, as the vats are generally alkaline: indigo is more soluble at high pH. 669 more words

Dyeing

From Natural to Synthetic Dye

Many of my posts have highlighted textiles that used natural dyes (plants, insects, shellfish) to get their colour, however, today I thought it was about time I shared the brilliance of one man’s accidental discovery which went on to revolutionize the dye industry.  675 more words

Textiles

What to do with indigo, part I

So what am I doing with the vats? At this point I’m primarily interested in seeing how easy they are to assemble and run, and what the pH is, information that will help me to choose vat methods for dyeing projects in the future.  420 more words

Dyeing

The Fructose 1-2-3 vat: an indigo vat for the 21st century?

Using only urine (ammonia) and natural indigo, the sig vat is perhaps the least polluting, most environmentally-sound of all the indigo vat recipes, but the need to collect and store urine, the smell, and the need for multiple dips to obtain darker blues meant the dyeing industry welcomed development of new methods of dyeing with indigo. 528 more words

Dyeing

That traditional sig vat: results!

We left our trusty sig vat on May 15th, hoping for a warm day that didn’t occur for another two days. But by the 17th the liquid was very definitely yellow-green although there was a lot of sediment and  particulate matter adhering to the glass of the jar. 1,053 more words

Dyeing