Tags » Institutions

A Skeptical Note on Policy-Prescriptive Political Science

My sometimes-colleague Michael Horowitz wrote a great piece for War on the Rocks last week on what “policy relevance” means for political scientists who study international affairs, and the different forms that relevance can take. 567 more words

Michael Horowitz

alixrgreen reblogged this on thehistoricalimperative and commented:

work shedJay Ulfelder's recent 'skeptical note' on the 'actionability' of political science research makes some essential points about the problematic assumptions underpinning policy recommendations. In Britain, the Blairite manifesto pitch 'what counts is what works' subdues the complexities of research method that might, at best, conclude 'what works here' (with further caveats about target population and other central aspects of the design). I'm not sure, however, that scholars of any discipline should therefore refrain from proposing recommendations or, even more cautiously, withdraw from offering expert advice. One of the important problems Ulfelder identifies is the uncertainties that are involved in the space between research and policy. How can a scholar answer the 'so what?' question that follows from any finding?  There are two issues that we can unpack here. The first is the inevitability, indeed, the necessity, of uncertainty. Policy is messy, unstable and contested because it involves human beings and their beliefs, habits, commitments, decisions and relationships - in the exercise of power, the exertion of influence, in policy implementation and debate. Instead of searching for the definitive research design to address all the assumptions about the transferability of findings - or indeed, just leaving it to 'elected officials and bureaucrats' to do the interpretation - we should be bringing together different disciplines with complementary insights. Given the uncertainties of anything involving human beings, the humanities need to be in there too, rather than ignored as irrelevant, if not ornamental. The other issue is the 'so what?' question. I agree it's hard for scholars to come up with policy recommendations, but that's at least in part due to their lack of experience of policymaking in practice. In the UK, there is far less interchange between higher education and government than in the USA and the academic career is still pretty intolerant of periods spent in other settings, something that needs to change. Taking a look over the fence and trying to prescribe policy interventions based on research designed for academic purposes seems foolish at best, if not rather arrogant as well as misguided. Humanities scholars may be largely ignored, but we can often be too concerned to preserve our integrity by not allowing policy concerns to 'sully' our work. This seems a rather self-defeating formula. Policymakers don't get access to an ecosystem of expertise. Scholars remain on the far side of the fence lamenting the intellectual illiteracy of political rhetoric and decision-making. But does it need to be this way? I don't think so. But there's no easy policy prescription for fixing it, as it involves major shifts in perspective among scholars - towards actively looking for cross-disciplinary approaches - and in policy communities that often have limited conceptions of 'relevant' evidence. Being honest in response to a request for expert advice is not just about admitting the limits of one's own expertise but also the limits of one's own discipline. It's the mix that matters, but it's not easy for the expert to admit it.

The Glacial Speed of Institutional Change

I just finished reading “The Long Process of Development” by Jerry Hough and Robin Grier. The quick response is that you should read this book. 1,052 more words

ISNIE is now SIOE

| Peter Klein |

I’ve long been involved with the International Society for New Institutional Economics (ISNIE). (In fact, I first met the esteemed Professor Foss at the inaugural ISNIE conference in St. 210 more words

- Klein -

Greece, the EU, and the Democratic Conundrum

In this post, Nicola Countouris, Reader at the UCL Faculty of Laws, analyses the reasons why the Greeks may have rejected the creditor institutions’ economic and reform proposals. 1,269 more words

Eurozone

Why should churches get a TAX-BREAK

Jesus Christ commanded His disciples to go into all the world and to preach the gospel, to make DISCIPLES of all nations, NOT to build churches. 457 more words

“A republic, if you can keep it.”

Saturday

The viability of political entities

There is a well-known story that Benjamin Franklin was asked as he left Independence Hall as the deliberations of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 were in their final day, “Well, Doctor, what have we got — a Republic or a Monarchy?” Franklin’s famous response to this was, “A Republic, madam — if you can keep it.” (The source of this anecdote is from notes of Dr. 536 more words

Geopolitics And Geostrategy

Museums as Drivers of Public Values

I often find myself explaining to people the under utilization of our museums and the impact it can have on public value. An important question raised by cultural leaders, institutional funders and policy makers internationally is underlining the scope of public values and how to measure it? 496 more words

MUSEUMS