Tags » Integral Yoga

Being and Becoming Are One

When we reflect on the nature of our existence, we frequently treat the universe as something inconscient and mechanical, a stage for our conscious action. To the extent we reflect further on how this seemingly mechanical universe came about, we tend to posit some kind of external “Creator”, to whom we attribute qualities such as Infinite, All-Knowing, All-Powerful, while somehow this creator is outside the manifested universe. 357 more words

Sri Aurobindo

Oneness As the Basis For the Integral Yoga

The Upanishads state that there is “One without a second” and “All this is the Brahman”. Taken together, we can recognize the basis of Oneness. When translated into the human dividing mind, however, these unequivocal statements of Oneness are parsed, fragmented, limited, separated and turned into a dichotomy between the “real” and the “unreal”. 350 more words

Sri Aurobindo

The Aim of the Integral Yoga

There are many different viewpoints in the world about the meaning of our lives and what the aim of life should be. Traditionally, there have been two major “camps”. 387 more words

Sri Aurobindo

The Supreme and Universal Relation of Purusha and Prakriti

From the human standpoint, Purusha and Prakriti represent a duality. We therefore focus on one or the other of these and pursue the implications of either a focus on the soul or on the manifestation of nature. 280 more words

Sri Aurobindo

The True Relations of the Soul and Nature

Materialists believe that the spiritual quest is essentially illusory and the only reality is the world of manifestation. Their goal is to achieve success within the scope of that reality and they tend to treat matters unseen or occult as self-deception or scams. 436 more words

Sri Aurobindo

The Soul's Poise As Active Sanctioner of Nature

As the witness consciousness takes on the role of acknowledging and upholding Nature’s action, the first poise may be one of passivity whereby the soul recognizes that it is supporting the action of Nature, but still recognizes that the original impulsion and intention comes from “elsewhere”. 282 more words

Sri Aurobindo

The Soul As the Upholder of the Action of Nature

The soul’s poise as “witness” of Nature, uninvolved, and observing, but not actively participating, is an important first step in the liberation of the soul from its apparent subjection to Nature. 237 more words

Sri Aurobindo