Tags » Iranian Politics

Everything's coming up Rouhani...for now

Forgive me for being a couple of weeks behind on this story, but Iran held the second round of its parliamentary election on April 29. This was a runoff round for 68 seats for which no candidate was able to get at least 25% in the first round, held on February 26. 1,569 more words

Furriners

Azer: On Mother's Day, Mr. Trudeau, please help me get my kids back

When my oldest child, Sharvahn, was five, she used her allowance to buy me a Hallmark Mother’s Day card. As I waited outside the store, she chose a card festooned with purple flowers. 645 more words

Columnists

Catching up: Iran

After a much-needed break, I’m going to try to get back to some regular blogging. But in order to do that, I’ve got to make some sense of what’s been going on while I’ve been away–for my own sake far more than for yours. 2,175 more words

Furriners

Glavin: Canada's outrageous Iran complex

In the matter of respectable opinion on the subject of last weekend’s sham elections in Iran, a new kind of Canadian consensus can be discerned from the headlines. 1,218 more words

Politics

My Iran election primer, at Medium

I just posted a primer for tomorrow’s Iranian elections at Medium:

The parliamentary elections are important  — a less hardline parliament means more space for Rouhani to implement his domestic agenda (although even an outright reformist parliament would be subject to being overriden by the Guardians’ Council and the Supreme Leader), and a more hardline parliament means Rouhani will struggle to get much done before he has to stand for reelection next year.

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Furriners

Pretend democracy

I wanted to write a post this week about how there are actually signs that moderates are gaining some traction in Iranian politics for the first time since Hassan Rouhani was elected president, but you know what? 1,334 more words

Furriners

Iran releases four U.S. prisoners, including Washington Post journalist held on espionage charges

TEHRAN, Iran — Iranian state television announced Saturday that the government had freed four dual-nationality prisoners, and a person close to Iran’s judiciary confirmed to The Associated Press that Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian was one of them. 722 more words

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