Tags » James Ellroy

Pulp Consumption: L.A. Confidential

L.A. Confidential is a 1997 film based on a novel by James Ellroy, set in the 1950s but filmed in a very ’90s style. It is a master class in adaptation, taking what many people thought was an unfilmable book and boil it down to its essential elements. 422 more words

Pulp Consumption

Sing Out, Louise!*

An interesting post from Moira at Clothes in Books has got me thinking about what I’ll call ‘stage parents.’ These are parents who push their children to excel, far beyond the usual rules about getting schoolwork done, or the usual supports, such as going to games or paying for music lessons. 966 more words

WPLongForm

True Detective: Third Season Confirmed

by Benjamín Harguindey

Following two years of silence after 2015’s unanymously panned second season, HBO has finally confirmed a third season of True Detective is in the works and the protagonist has already been cast. 380 more words

Twin Peaks

The Big Nowhere

A monster is loose in 1950’s Los Angeles; three cops must learn to work together to bring the killer down, beach must fight his own demons along the way, and each discovers that the web of crime goes much deeper than any of them could have ever imagined… 378 more words

There'll be One Child Born and a World to Carry On*

One of the many things that parents do is pass on certain traditions to their children. That’s one important way in which culture is perpetuated, if you think about it. 1,035 more words

WPLongForm

L.A. Confidential

James Ellroy writes brutal crime-noir thrillers set in 1950’s Los Angeles. Dramatic, savage, soaked in gore and lust and slang, Ellroy’s books are both grimy realistic and flights of pure mythology. 386 more words

My Review of Don Winslow's "The Force"

It’s a thing now–books, movies, and TV shows that ask us to sympathize with, and even root for, dirty cops.

Of course, we’ve long been accustomed to characters like Dirty Harry, Martin Riggs and John Luther, fictional cops who broke the rules, but did so in the interest of justice. 344 more words