Tags » Japanese Americans

Homecoming

Beef Teriyaki Skewering

The Obon Festival is a time when Japanese-American people return to their communities and honor the deceased. According the Buddhist Church, the Obon Festival is called Kangi-e, the gathering of joy. 28 more words

City Life

Inside Manzanar concentration camp.

Manzanar is most widely known as the site of one of ten American concentration camps where over 110,000 Japanese Americans were incarcerated during World War II from December 1942 to 1945. 431 more words

History

Traveling Japanese Internment Exhibit Makes Stop In Salem

A traveling exhibit on Oregon’s participation in incarcerating Japanese Americans and immigrants during World War II made a stop at the Capitol building in Salem this week. 11 more words

OPB - Oregon Public Broadcasting

Exhibit shows Japanese-Americans’ internment ‘built on widespread racism’ 

About 120,000 U.S. citizens of Japanese ancestry were forcibly removed and imprisoned in America during the months after the Japanese Imperial Navy Air Service bombed Pearl Harbor on Dec. 69 more words

Ontario Argus Observer

Pilgrimage marks anniversary of Japanese American internment

A pilgrimage to the Portland Expo Center on Saturday marks the 75th anniversary of the day Oregon Japanese Americans were forced from their homes during World War II. 43 more words

The Oregonian

New From Library of Congress: Japanese-American Internment Camp Newspapers, 1942 to 1946

Now available from the Library of Congress: Japanese-American Internment Camp Newspapers, 1942 to 1946. From the About page: “Produced by the Japanese-Americans interned at assembly centers and relocation centers around the country during World War II, these newspapers provide a unique look into the daily lives of the people who were held in these camps. 33 more words

New Resources

Rafu Shimpo: Haynes Foundation Grant Preserves Photographs Documenting JA Life In LA

Rafu Shimpo: Haynes Foundation Grant Preserves Photographs Documenting JA Life In LA. “Specifically, the grant will be used to create the Ninomiya Photography Studio Collection Access Project at CSUDH and preserve, catalog, and archive approximately 10,000 packets of photographic negatives taken by the former studio, which was owned and operated by Japanese American photographer Ichiro Ninomiya in Little Tokyo. 43 more words

New Resources