Tags » John Barrymore

PRE-CODE MICHAEL CURTIZ HORROR: THE MAD GENIUS (1931), DOCTOR X (1932) AND MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM (1933) PLUS THE WALKING DEAD (1936)

The Mad Genius (1931), Doctor X (1932) and Mystery Of The Wax Museum (1933) are three atypical pre-code films from Hungarian-American director Michael Curtiz. Better known for such classics as… 1,450 more words

Film Reviews

Loathe others, loathe yourself: the Gerald Kersh school of characterisation

Gerald Kersh does not like other people. Or himself. (Or cats.) Let us consider his classic novel of low-life London, Night and the City… 1,525 more words

Books

GRAND HOTEL (1932)

Edmund Goulding’s Best Picture Academy Award winning GRAND HOTEL (1932) set the standard for the ensemble cast concept of films to come. It takes an intimate view of a diverse array of characters whose lives intersect at the Grand Hotel of Berlin. 746 more words

Blogathon

Grand Hotel (1932, Edmund Goulding)

Grand Hotel opens with an expository sequence–director Goulding cuts between each of the film’s major players as they talk in the hotel’s telephone booths. It’s a brief, fantastic sequence, thanks to Goulding’s direction and William H. 320 more words

Classics

Midnight (1939)

The great site In The Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood is hosting a blogathon all about the legendary Barrymore dynasty. I’m taking part by freshening up a post on… 32 more words

Comedy

Fall and Rise

John Barrymore may be the first post-modern actor. At his best—and when Barrymore is at his best, it is considerably so—he stands outside the character he’s acting, as if observing himself and urging us, the audience, to observe him from a similar outside viewpoint. 1,872 more words

Comedy

Dinner at Eight (George Cukor, 1933)

This is my contribution to the Barrymore Trilogy Blogathon. Please do look at the great range of postings.

“The most glamorous production of all time,” proclaims the original trailer to… 935 more words

Classic Movie