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John Dewey - How We Think (1910)

When it is said, however, that thinking is impossible without language, we must recall that language includes much more than oral and written speech. Gestures, pictures, monuments, visual images, finger movements—anything consciously employed as a sign is, logically, language.

Nonfiction

John Dewey - How We Think (1910)

That the elementary curriculum is overloaded is a common complaint.

Nonfiction

John Dewey - How We Think (1910)

Truly practical men give their minds free play about a subject without asking too closely at every point for the advantage to be gained; exclusive preoccupation with matters of use and application so narrows the horizon as in the long run to defeat itself.

Nonfiction

John Dewey - How We Think (1910)

We think in order to grasp meaning, but none the less every extension of knowledge makes us aware of blind and opaque spots, where with less knowledge all had seemed obvious and natural.

Nonfiction

Philosophy Sidetracked

In 1917 John Dewey published “The Need for a Recovery of Philosophy,” a reflection on the role of philosophy in early 20th century American life. In it Dewey expressed concern that philosophy had become “sidetracked from the main currents of contemporary life,” too much the domain of professionals and adepts. 189 more words

Philosophy

John Dewey - How We Think (1910)

A question well put is half answered; i.e. a difficulty clearly apprehended is likely to suggest its own solution,—while a vague and miscellaneous perception of the problem leads to groping and fumbling.

Nonfiction

John Dewey - How We Think (1910)

Genuine freedom, in short, is intellectual; it rests in the trained power of thought, in ability to ‘turn things over,’ to look at matters deliberately, to judge whether the amount and kind of evidence requisite for decision is at hand, and if not, to tell where and how to seek such evidence.

Nonfiction